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Archive for Wednesday, September 12, 1990

LOCAL CENTER GETS GRANTS FOR TREATMENT PROGRAMS

September 12, 1990

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A Lawrence-based drug and alcohol treatment center that in recent years has quickly expanded into statewide programs has been awarded more than $900,000 in grants to operate treatment facilities for women and children.

Bruce Beale, executive director of the DCCCA Center, said today that the agency has received two grants, one to begin a women's drug treatment center in Wichita and another to start a drug and alcohol treatment center for adolescents in Topeka.

Beale said both the drug and alcohol treatment programs are aimed at attacking one of the major shortfalls in the state programs for women and children from poor working families.

THE GRANTS were among awards totaling $4.2 million announced Tuesday by Gov. Mike Hayden.

The Sedgwick County Women's Interdiction Program run by DCCCA in Wichita will be the second program in the state to focus on the treatment of women with drug problems and also allow space for care of their children.

Beale said the program, which received a grant of $721,000, will have spaces for 15 women and 25 children. He said the program is similar to one started last year by DCCCA in Topeka.

"Women who need drug treatment just don't have places to take care of their kids," Beale said.

THE OTHER grant, for $212,000, is to begin an adolescent treatment program in Topeka. It will have 20 slots for children between the ages of 11 and 17 who have drug or alcohol problems, Beale said.

He said children in the program will come for treatment programs after school and on weekends. He said the facility is expected to be located near the Women's Treatment Center in Topeka and will be called the Capital City Adolescent Treatment Program.

Statewide, the grants announced by Hayden on Tuesday will allow about 2,450 low-income Kansans to receive treatment next year.

``I am pleased that through a combination of federal and state funds, we are able to provide more treatment opportunities for people who are often the most vulnerable, but can't afford to pay for the services,'' Hayden said in a statement.

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