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Archive for Sunday, November 4, 1990

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POOR LEADERSHIP
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: For the second month in a row, the Action Report published by the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce headlines the importance of the trafficway:
TAX PLEDGE HARD TO TAKE
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Due to the recent reappraisal and mill levy increase I find my taxes had increased five-fold. I figured the only thing I could do is to pay those taxes under protest. I stood in line to get protest forms. Stood in line to pay under protest, took off work to meet with the appraiser. Fellow taxpayers, do you know what I accomplished by doing this? Nothing.
NAISMITH FREEWAY?
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Vote NO on the south Lawrence trafficway.
LACK OF INFORMATION
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: I am extremely disappointed with the inefficient coverage of this year’s gubernatorial campaign. The outcome of a recent poll suggests that one-in-four registered Kansas voters are considering skipping the governor’s box on their ballot this Nov. 6.
OPEN ENROLLMENT?
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: A recent Journal-World editorial enthusiastically described the virtues of the Governor’s Commission on a Public Agenda report which outlined an open enrollment method based on parent and student perceptions of a school’s merits. Any student could go to whichever school he or she wished. No boundaries other than those imposed upon themselves. No social guides in this previously socially regulated and presently socially financed school system. We have yet to vote, and already the 15th Street equalizer of socioeconomic balance begins to erode. Did any of us ever believe that it wouldn’t? Did the school board, who listed the balance as a major consideration in their proposal?
OVERPRICED PROJECT
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: The proposed “Alvamar” high school is going to cost the taxpayers of Lawrence $31,000,000 if approved.
RELIEVING TRAFFIC
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Since living on Massachusetts Street, we have seen first-hand the dramatic increase in cars and trucks on our city streets and not just at rush hour. It’s incredible to me that opponents of new roads are trying to convince us that these roads will increase traffic and put more trucks in our neighborhoods.
SAFER ROUTE
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Something absurd is going on. I hear opponents of the south Lawrence trafficway stating that this new roadway will bring trucks carrying hazardous materials into our neighborhoods.
WRONG AGAIN
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Opponents of the south Lawrence trafficway are wrong again. Two weeks ago, an opponent stated in a letter to the editor that the south Lawrence trafficway would have 15 stop signs or signals, one per mile along the 14-mile route. That statement was wrong, dead wrong! There won’t be any! If opponents had studied the environmental impact statement, they would have knows that the trafficway will not become another 23rd Street.
THANKS FOR FUNDING
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: Some decisions are easy you just consider the consequences. Do we want to have federal and state taxes pay $37 million of the cost of the south Lawrence trafficway or wait and have to foot the whole cost ourselves? Do we want to dodge boats and trucks while driving down 23rd or have them safely circle the city? Do we want our children to continue to risk their lives every day crossing neighborhood streets designed for half the traffic they’re now carrying, or worry about the life of a frog that hasn’t been seen in 15 years?
SENIORS SPEAK
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: We are two Lawrence High School seniors writing with concern to the school bond issue. Our concern is that the wrong people are being asked their opinions. The decision of the school board and the final vote of the taxpayers will affect the students of Lawrence directly. We feel that our opinion on an issue that influences the course of our lives is needed.
PLANNED GROWTH
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: I am a native of Lawrence, a graduate of Lawrence High School and have spent four-fifths of my life here. I share a great pride in Lawrence High School for myself, for my three children (who are also graduates) and for all the citizens of Lawrence. I am sad that Lawrence has grown so large that problems which are the result of growth must be addressed, but address them we must.
ATTORNEY SAYS ZONING APPEALS BOARD WAS BIASED IN RULING ON TRIPLEX CASE
November 4, 1990
The attorney for an East Lawrence resident says the Lawrence Board of Zoning Appeals was biased and ignored the law when it ruled that a Pennsylvania Street triplex was legally renovated. The attorney, Don Strole represents Richard Kershenbaum, an East Lawrence resident who is appealing a BZA ruling handed down in May.
WOODLING COLUMN
November 4, 1990
Notes and quotes while wondering if Cincinnati owner Marge Schott has already ordered the Reds’ World Championship rings from Cracker Jack… Four former Kansas basketball players were listed on NBA opening-day rosters Greg Dreiling (Indiana), Danny Manning (L.A. Clippers), Kevin Pritchard (Golden State) and Rick Calloway (Sacramento)…
TULIP M. SMITH
November 4, 1990
Graveside services for Tulip M. Terrell Smith, 86, Berkeley, Calif., will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence. Mrs. Smith died Thursday at a convalescent home in Oakland, Calif.
RAYMOND L. SMITH
November 4, 1990
Funeral services for Raymond Leroy “Smitty” Smith, 68, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Dengel and Sons Mortuary, Ottawa. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery in Franklin County. Mr. Smith died Friday at his home of natural causes.
November 4, 1990
Republican congressional candidate Scott Morgan heard all about Kansas politics while growing up. “I always got the calls from politicians who were angry with my father,” said Morgan, a Lawrence attorney whose father, Ray, was a political reporter for the Kansas City Star for about 30 years.
SLATTERY RUNNING ON RECORDEXPERIENCE
November 4, 1990
U.S. Rep. Jim Slattery, up for re-election in the 2nd District, never thought he’d come close to serving a decade in Congress. “I really didn’t,” the four-term Topeka Democrat said. “I can’t believe I’ve been there eight years. It’s gone by so fast.”
CHALLENGER HOPES TO TURN THE TIDE IN 2ND DISTRICT RACE
November 4, 1990
If the trend continues, U.S. Rep. Jim Slattery, D-Kan., will receive three-fourths of the vote Tuesday to soundly defeat another Republican nominee. And it’s a sure bet GOP challenger Scott Morgan, Lawrence, knows the 2nd District is dominated by Republicans but has elected a Democrat the past eight years.
COLD WEATHER BRINGS RAINFALL
November 4, 1990
Although colder weather came along with it, northeast Kansas residents received the first significant rainfall in a number of weeks starting Saturday afternoon. The rain had a chance to change to snow tonight, when low temperatures were forecast near freezing, according to John Woynick, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Topeka.
ESTHER ATKINSON
November 4, 1990
Services for Esther Atkinson, 90, McPherson, will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Free Methodist Church in McPherson with the Rev. Claude Griffith officiating. Burial will follow in McPherson Cemetery. Mrs. Atkinson died Friday at a McPherson hospital. She was born Aug. 31, 1900, in Shenandoah, Iowa.
JAYHAWKS BREATHED SIGH
November 4, 1990
All eyes on the Kansas sideline watched as Cary Blanchard’s 51-yard field goal went airborne. “I kinda turned my back and was praying,” KU wide receiver Kenny Drayton said.
AMERICAN INDIAN DANCE TROUPE MERGES ART, FLASH, NATIVE RITUAL
November 4, 1990
PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO TAKE THE CHILL OUT OF COLD WEATHER
November 4, 1990
Several programs in Lawrence are gearing up to help make the upcoming winter months a little warmer and the holidays a little happier. Douglas County Warm Hearts, the Holiday Bureau and Scotch Fabric Care Services all have announced plans for their annual assistance programs.
GOVERNOR CANDIDATES DIFFER ON EDUCATION
November 4, 1990
Kansas gubernatorial candidates Joan Finney and Mike Hayden promise that if elected Tuesday they’ll prove their worth as an “education governor.” Hayden, a Republican seeking his second four-year term, likes to tout the fact that higher education funding increased more than $100 million during his first term.
LAWRENCE RESIDENT DROWNS IN ARKANSAS
November 4, 1990
The retired owner of a Lawrence chemical company drowned Friday while fishing in the White River in Baxter County, Ark. An investigator for the Baxter County Sheriff’s Department said the body of M.T. “Chic” Sales, 67, Lawrence, was found by fishermen about 10 a.m. Saturday.
LOCAL GROUP ANXIOUS TO FULFILL THE DREAMS
November 4, 1990
Organizers of the local chapter of the Dream Factory are looking forward to fulfilling the dreams of a local child. “We are still asking community help to find prospective recipients,” said David Hallenbeck, boardmember of the Lawrence Dream Factory chapter.
S MEDICAID PATIENTS IN LIMBO
November 4, 1990
Medicaid patients of a Lawrence doctor suddenly have found that their Kansas medical cards no longer will be accepted at his office. A total of 385 Medicaid patients are affected by the decision of the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services to remove Dr. Ross Sciara, whose office is at 1400 W. Sixth, as a primary care physician under the agency’s Primary Care Network.
BOND VOTES TO CLOSE CHAPTER IN LOCAL CONTROVERSIES
November 4, 1990
Voters in Tuesday’s election will encounter forks in two roads in the separate bond issues for the south Lawrence trafficway and eastern parkway. Douglas County voters, including those in Lawrence, will decide whether to approve the already-issued $4 million in bonds for the trafficway. Lawrence voters alone will vote on a separate $4 million bond issue for the parkway. Together, the two roads comprise the majority of the proposed circumferential loop of highways around Lawrence.
FOR THE RECORD
November 4, 1990
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
HOSPITAL REPORT
November 4, 1990
DISMISSALS Denise Wyatt and baby boy, Lawrence; Ashlea Black, Hiawatha; and Linda Kuykendall Ness and baby girl, Lawrence.
SKI PATROL
November 4, 1990
Walt Hoeflflicker of Olathe stretched himself out on the sidewalk in front of the Snow Creek ski lodge last Sunday and prepared to be a `back-injury victim.’ A team of five Snow Creek Volunteer Ski Patrol members all from Lawrence calmly worked Hoeflflicker through the first-aid steps appropriate for a suspected back injury.
N.Y. ARTIST PURSUES KANSAS ROOTS
November 4, 1990
Once upon a time, Macys on New York’s 34th Street had a bargain basement. In the ‘80s, the store supplanted the racks of rejected clothing for a gourmet food supermarket. That basement lives again in a series of fabric designs by Jan Schoonover, a Kansas University graduate and now a New York artist. The misshapen, brightly covered bras and other assorted items now hang on the walls of the Artist En Masse gallery in Lawrence.
ARTIST EXPLORES THE MAGIC OF PAINT
November 4, 1990
Judith McCrea uses bright color frugally she often lets the colors fly across the top or middle of a large oil painting, briefly disturbing her basic blues and purples. But it’s not the colors that bring life to McCrea’s work: It’s her figures. Sometimes they embrace, sometimes they slop over bars, sometimes they stand or lie naked. In those forms, McCrea, one of Lawrence’s newest artists, finds a great deal of magic.
DUTCH ACTOR BRINGS SHOW TO BAKER
November 4, 1990
One hundred years after he committed suicide, Vincent Van Gogh has come to dominate the 1990 cultural scene in The Netherlands. Just about everywhere you go, you can hear the artist’s praises sung, said actor Klaas Hofstra. That may be why people were ready to get a dose of the flip side and the call went out for “Vincent,” Hofstra’s one-man show that takes up two different viewpoints, negative and positive, about Van Gogh’s work.
MINORITIES URGED ON TO GRADUATE SCHOOL
November 4, 1990
Minority undergraduate students should attend graduate school because they have significant and substantial contributions to make in society, not out of need to “pull themselves up by the booststraps,” a speaker at a minority education conference said Saturday. “I want you in somebody’s graduate school we need you there,” said Sidney A. McNairy, director of the Research Centers in Minority Institutions Program at the National Center for Research Resources.
LOCAL ARTS
November 4, 1990
Philosopher to speak on the world of art Arthur Danto, professor of philosophy at Columbia University, will speak on “A Philosopher in the Art World” at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the auditorium in the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art. Danto has a reputation for stirring unrest among art critics and historians for his views on the role of the observer in the phenomenon of art.
MORE THAN A SCI-FI SPOOF
November 4, 1990
A lot of people see “Little Shop of Horrors” as a tuneful spoof of a musical it digs in at all those cheap science fiction movies from the 1950s and throws in some social satire as well. But Paul Meier sees something a lot deeper.
EFFORT
November 4, 1990
Democrat Dick Williams is taking time from his 1990 campaign for the U.S. Senate to promote a “Dump Dole” campaign in 1992. Williams, who is facing an uphill battle in his quest to unseat Sen. Nancy Kassebaum in this year’s campaign, has written to supporters encouraging them to prepare now for the 1992 battle against Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan.
40S
November 4, 1990
In the 1940s and 1950s, as the world of jazz moved from big band swing to the modern jazz dialects of the Charlie Parker-Dizzy Gillespie bebop revolution and the third stream implosions of classical and jazz popularized in the harmoniclly dense layering of Dave Brubeck, a revival of traditional jazz sprouted as well. Surprisingly, it was the sunny climes of California that spawned Dixieland’s rebirth. This seeming quirk calls into question such geographic assumptions as the still prevailing “up-the-river” myth which privileges New Orleans as the birthplace of jazz. In fact, jazz history’s topography is a much more convoluted and fascinating affair. Therefore, one of the most interesting and little known geo-jazz facts (except, of course, for the cognescenti who prune jazzdom’s roots with Michael Maher on his Saturday morning “The Vintage Jazz Show” on KANU-FM), is that the essentially post-war Dixieland revival erupted in San Franciso and Los Angeles.
LL TAKE BLAME FOR MISSED KICK
November 4, 1990
Cary Blanchard couldn’t blame the center and he couldn’t blame the holder. The only place he saw fit to put the blame for his missed 51-yard field-goal attempt late in the fourth quarter was with himself.
TIME TO START OVER
November 4, 1990
To the Editor: With regard to the proposal for a second high school in Lawrence, I would like to point out that the present physical situation represents an extremely low density of land use.
POSSIBILITIES FOR SRS REFORM IMPRESS TASK FORCE MEMBER
November 4, 1990
Sen. Wint Winter Jr. felt the pressure mounting. As one of 17 members of the Task Force on Social and Rehabilitation Services, Winter, R-Lawrence, said he has grown worried that the group would not be able to find any way to meet Kansans growing expectations for reform of the state welfare agency.
FOR ROADS
November 4, 1990
Few local votes in recent years have been as important as the two trafficway bond issues Lawrence and Douglas County voters will be deciding Tuesday. The Journal-World believes that both deserve “Yes” votes.
SCHOOL BOND ISSUE FACES DECISION FROM DEEPLY DIVIDED COMMUNITY
November 4, 1990
Opponents of the proposed school bond issue say they don’t have a solution for crowded Lawrence schools. They just know they don’t like the Lawrence school board’s answer to the problem. On Tuesday, Lawrence School District residents will vote on a proposed $31 million bond issue for building a second high school, renovating the existing high school and making improvements to other local schools.
BAKER COASTS TO 30-7 VICTORY AGAINST VALLEY
November 4, 1990
The 10th-ranked Baker Wildcats all but assured themselves a playoff spot as they cruised to a 30-7 victory over Missouri Valley on a rainy Saturday afternoon at Liston Stadium. “I was hoping we would just stay with them and try and score with them. Holding their offense to just seven points is just unbelievable,” Baker coach Charlie Richard said.
CHOKE HOLD, 31-30
November 4, 1990
Kansas did NOT win the Orange Bowl here Saturday. You wouldn’t have known it, though, by watching Glen Mason. How happy was the Jayhawks’ head coach?
M.T. SALES
November 4, 1990
Funeral services are pending for M.T. “Chic” Sales, 67, Lawrence, at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Mr. Sales drowned Saturday in the White River in Baxter County, Ark., while on a fishing trip.