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Archive for Sunday, May 20, 1990

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LIFE
May 20, 1990
A Japanese nun who visited Lawrence last week to research a French saint said Kansas’ recent rainy weather fitted perfectly with water images she associates with the saint. Sister Tetsuko Nakagawa came from Tokyo to learn more about Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne, an 1840’s missionary to the Pottawatomi Indians who was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1988.
GRADUATION REFLECTIONS
May 20, 1990
A line of Kansas University graduates winding through the campanile, down Mount Oread and into Memorial Stadium is one of the grandest sights the university has to offer. Commencement exercises even those forced inside because of rain are the culmination of hopes, dreams and a lot of hard work not only for the students but for their families as well. Proud parents with cameras watch the procession led by distinguished faculty. Students show a mixture of reverence and relief as they take their place in the line. They look around at the people with whom they have shared their KU years and with whom they will face new challenges in the world outside KU.
INSURANCE AGENCY EXPANDS ITS BASE
May 20, 1990
A local insurance agency that can trace its history back to Lawrence’s frontier days has recently been expanding its reach throughout eastern Kansas. The agency, Charlton Manley Inc., has already made inroads into Topeka by acquiring a firm there. And Charlton Manley’s top officials said last week they hope to move into the Johnson County area within the next few years either by acquiring an existing agency or starting a satellite office from scratch.
WINDMILLING
May 20, 1990
Russell Smelser loves windmills. Dempsters, Curries, Star-Zeffers, Monitors and all the rest. He owns some, he sells and repairs some, he reads about them in every snatch of literature he can find. He’s even been to windmill school, and he’s headed for a windmill convention next month.
RACIAL EVENTS LEAVE SCAR ON KU
May 20, 1990
On her second day at Kansas University, Stacy Burtin wanted to retreat from the Hill. But she stuck it out, even though she wasn’t always comfortable as a minority student at the predominantly white school. She will graduate today from the School of Business.
LONG, HARD ROAD ENDS WITH PH.D.
May 20, 1990
Beth Norris, Charles Perry and Randy Gordon have overcome personal bouts of angst and enormous financial obstacles to gain ownership of a small piece of parchment that identifies them as recipients of doctoral degrees. After years of dedication to challenging course work and scholarly research in their chosen fields, the three Kansas University graduate students will finally get their rewards today at the university’s 118th commencement ceremonies.
NEW ALUMNI LEADER LISTS FUNDING AS TOP PRIORITY
May 20, 1990
Jack Robinson, who will become president of the Kansas University Alumni Association on July 1, said he will be leading an organization that’s in good shape. “No dramatic changes are contemplated,” he said of his coming tenure. He will take over from outgoing president John Kane. Glee S. Smith Jr. of Larned will assume Robinson’s current position of executive vice president when Robinson takes office.
HAROLD A. HOLMES
May 20, 1990
Services for Harold Allen “Pappy” Holmes, 82, rural Linwood, will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Rumsey Funeral Home with the Rev. Charlie Dotson officiating. Burial will be in Mount Sidney Cemetery at Linwood. Mr. Holmes died Saturday at his home. He was born Feb. 26, 1908, in Tonganoxie.
HAYDEN TO ATTEND CONFERENCE KANSAS
May 20, 1990
Gov. Mike Hayden will be in Lawrence on Monday for the kick-off of the 90th annual Kansas Conference on Social Welfare, which will be held Monday through Wednesday at the Lawrence Holidome, 200 McDonald Dr. The Kansas Conference of Social Welfare is a statewide organization consisting of members involved in social work.
BUDIG DECRIES FUNDING, CAMPUS RACISM
May 20, 1990
Kansas University Chancellor Gene Budig said Saturday in his State of the University address that there are reasons to be both optimistic and pessimistic about the future of the state’s largest higher education institution. He hailed alumni and others who have donated time and money to KU, blasted the Legislature’s inadequate financial commitment to the university and charged that ongoing campus racism and discrimination was the product of “closed minds.”
CHUCK BERG COLUMN
May 20, 1990
BOOGIE DOWN, Ernestine Anderson with the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra (Concord CCD-4407): Ernestine Anderson has been shouting vocals with big-band backing since the late 1940s. Here, her wonderfully supple flights are given consummate support from a wickedly delicious band of Los Angeles pros co-led by conductor-arranger-bassist John Clayton, saxophonist Jeff Clayton, drummer Jeff Hamilton. It’s a sumptuous feast with savory standards such as “Only Trust Your Heart,” “Day By Day” and “Wait Till You See Him.” Although Anderson’s impressive credits include stints with Lionel Hampton, Quincy Jones, Johnny Otis and Horace Silver that go back to the late 1940s, it was bassist extraordinaire Ray Brown who put her in the limelight of the 1976 Concord Jazz Festival, and a highly successful string of albums for the Concord label with Hank Jones, George Shearing and the aforementioned Brown. Among Anderson’s considerable assets are her razor-sharp intonation, precise articulation and sassy swingingness.
SPEAKERS URGE MINORITIES TO BE LEADERS
May 20, 1990
The approximately 225 minority students who will receive degrees from Kansas University today were recognized Saturday night as members of another minority. “Through your hard work and sacrifice, you have achieved a goal that still eludes the majority of citizens of our African-American, Asian-American, Hispanic-American and Native-American communities,” Marshall Jackson, director of minority affairs, said in a letter to minority students who attended the university’s 14th annual minority graduation banquet.
FIVE KU SENIORS HONORED AT GRADUATION BREAKFAST
May 20, 1990
Five Kansas University seniors recognized as outstanding members of the class of 1990 were to be honored this morning during KU’s annual graduation breakfast in the Kansas Union. KU Chancellor Gene A. Budig will make the presentations. Winners were chosen by the Chancellor’s Student Awards Committee from nominations submitted by students, faculty and staff. Committee members include KU students, faculty and staff.
ROBERT T. KOMER
May 20, 1990
A mass of resurrection for Robert T. “Bob” Komer, 84, Eudora, will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Holy Family Catholic Church in Eudora with the Rev. Patrick Fitzgerald officiating. Burial will be in Holy Family Catholic Cemetery. Mr. Komer died Saturday at the Eudora Nursing Center. He was born Aug. 6, 1905, in St. Joseph, Mo.
LOCAL ARTS
May 20, 1990
Theater group meets The Lawrence Community Theatre will hold its annual meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the basement of the theater, 1501 N.H. The theater group will elect officers and announce its next season. Theater members will hold a dinner at 6:30 p.m. before the meeting. For more information, call the theater at 843-SHOW.
REFUGEES ADJUSTING TO NEW LIFE
May 20, 1990
A Guatemalan woman and her five children staying in Lawrence are doing very well and “really like it here,” according to the coordinator of the organization sponsoring the family. Jill Jenkins, coordinator of the Lawrence Latin American Refugee Committee, said Clara Soto Flores and her five children are continuing to adjust well to life in Kansas.
CONFERENCE EXAMINES EFFECTS OF HERBICIDE ON DRINKING WATER
May 20, 1990
Increasing levels of herbicides are entering the ground and surface water systems from which we get our drinking water. That is the finding of research done over a 10-state region, covering the central United States, by Michael Thurman and a team of researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey in Lawrence. The research included water systems in Kansas.
ARTIST SCOURS RURAL LANDSCAPE FOR HIS ART
May 20, 1990
Louis Copt’s two biggest influences are about 10,000 miles and hundreds of years apart: rural Kansas and traditional China. The Lawrence landscape painter, who is showing his most recent works through May at Roy’s Gallery and Framing, 1410 Kasold, says he’s been influenced heavily by looking at Chinese art, and he feels he’s brought an Asian sensibility to how he looks at the valleys, farms and rivers of eastern Kansas.
NOTES AND QUOTES
May 20, 1990
Notes and quotes while wondering if the Royals will be the first team told NOT to print World Series tickets… Wide receiver Quintin Smith, the first Kansas scholarship athlete affected by the provisions of NCAA Proposition 48 he sat out his freshman year in 1986 will receive a diploma in today’s KU graduation ceremonies…
S GOLD MEDAL CLUB
May 20, 1990
More than 400 Kansas University alumni took part in reunion activities this weekend, including the annual Gold Medal Club meeting and brunch Saturday in the Kansas Union. The club, which consists of KU alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago, has met at annually for nearly 50 years, said Donna Neuner, director of membership services for the KU Alumni Association.
KU WANTS TO MISS BIGBASEMENT
May 20, 1990
First place, Gary Schwartz says, is unattainable. Last place, however, isn’t out of the question as Kansas University’s track teams gear up for the Big Eight Outdoor, set for today and Monday at Oklahoma’s track.
LIKE FATHER, LIKE SONS?
May 20, 1990
Brothers Brad and Kendall Meade and twin brothers Drew and Ned Ryun know big-time track. They’ve lived with it. Their dads former Kansas athletes Julio Meade and Jim Ryun are big-time track.
FOR THE RECORD
May 20, 1990
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
DREAMS COME TRUE FOR TRIPLETS
May 20, 1990
They first dreamed of being doctors while still in grade school. This afternoon, that dream will be fulfilled when three brothers receive their degrees from the Kansas University Medical Center during graduation ceremonies on the KU campus. Perry, Philip and Paul Johnson didn’t just share the same career goals, though. They’re three of a kind triplets, to be exact.
CHU-TSING LI AND THE STRUGGLE FOR ART
May 20, 1990
From the safety of an American graduate school in 1949, Chu-Tsing Li watched events unfold in China that changed his life forever. In that year, the Communist revolution barred Li from returning to teach English, as he had hoped. But it also freed him to pursue a career in art history, a career that saw him rise to prominence as a scholar of contemporary Chinese art.
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 20, 1990
BIRTHS Donna and Dean Pearson, Lawrence, a boy, Saturday.