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Archive for Friday, May 4, 1990

Also from May 4

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THE MISSING LINKS
May 4, 1990
Dear Editor: For some of the city commissioners, the need for a municipal golf course seems unwarranted. They contend that one public regulation 18-hole golf course is enough and that a municipal golf course would be a huge success.
DRUG TESTING
May 4, 1990
Dear Editor: Commissioner Bob Schumm has made public the negative results of his drug test. Perhaps he shouldn’t have. Certainly his motives were good to refute rumors and innuendos stemming from Commissioner David Penny’s call for a policy of drug testing for city employees. Yet why should Commissioner Schumm submit to this harassment?
WORKING ON EDUCATION
May 4, 1990
Editor, Journal-World: We are writing in response to Mrs. Mondi’s April 26 letter concerning several issues facing public education. No one has ever said that our educational system in Lawrence is perfect. Those of us involved in it know better. We have, however, known some people who have left Lawrence only to return because of the quality of education we afford to students. Teachers make more than 5,000 decisions a day; we are sure that a mistake or two in judgment occasionally occurs. Yet, most teachers we know do not give up.
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS
May 4, 1990
Dear Editor: We (East Heights School students) have some concerns we hope you will consider.
RAINFALL TOTALS .31 OF AN INCH
May 4, 1990
A trickle of rain that fell Wednesday turned into more of a steady stream on Thursday, when nearly one-third of an inch of rain fell on Lawrence. According to records kept at the Kansas University Weather Service, the official reporting station for Lawrence, .31 of an inch of rain have fallen on Lawrence between 7 a.m. Thursday and 7 a.m. today. Light showers between Wednesday morning and Thursday morning deposited a scant .15 of an inch on Lawrence, bringing the total ranifall total for the month to just below half an inch. Normal rainfall amounts for the month of May is 4.2 inches.
STUDENTS PLAN POLICY PROTEST
May 4, 1990
Students were scheduled to protest U.S. Department of Defense policies about homosexuals at a 1:30 p.m. news conference today in Strong Hall. Liz Tolbert, a member of Gay and Lesbian Services of Kansas, said the group planned to protest the DOD and ROTC policies that exclude homosexuals from military service. She said the protest were to coincide with national protests.
ROBERT O. COMPTON
May 4, 1990
Services for Robert O. “Bob” Compton, 66, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Robert Freitag officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery where military graveside services will be conducted by Dorsey-Liberty Post No. 14 of the American Legion. Masonic graveside services will be conducted by Acacia Lodge No. 9 AF&AM. Mr. Compton died this morning at his home after a long illness.
LANNING SERVICES
May 4, 1990
Private services for Amanda Michelle Lanning, daughter of Dan and Judy Royse Lanning, Lawrence, will be Saturday at the First United Methodist Church in Ottawa, followed by private graveside services at Highland Cemetery in Ottawa. Amanda was stillborn Wednesday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
AFTER SUNDOWN, CAMPUS TAKES ON A NEW LIFE
May 4, 1990
It’s night on “The Hill.” And as the last bit of sunlight fades, Kansas University students take to the night. The pace changes, but the campus doesn’t go to sleep.
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 4, 1990
DISMISSALS Alma Mae Moorman, 1516 Mass.; Kimberly George and baby boy, Oskaloosa; Mary Bennett and baby boy, 3201 Longhorn Dr.
FOR THE RECORD
May 4, 1990
Law enforcement report Police reports
KU PROGRAM NO. 1 IN NATIONAL SURVEY
May 4, 1990
The Kansas University doctoral training program in special education, a fledgling academic unit a quarter century ago, ranks No. 1 in a new national survey. “Literally, from a little acorn we have a whole forest,” said Rud Turnbull, professor of special education and co-director of the Beach Center on Families and Disabilities.
SURCHARGE RATE FOR MALPRACTICE FUND WILL DROP
May 4, 1990
The recent good news for many Kansas doctors that their medical malpractice insurance rates will drop was followed by more good news this morning when it was announced that a surcharge they pay to the state will decrease as well. Kansas Insurance Commissioner Fletcher Bell announced today an average 13 percent reduction in the surcharge rates for the Kansas Health Care Stabilization Fund. Doctors pay into the fund to cover additional malpractice insurance above what is provided by insurance companies.
LETTER ARRIVES
May 4, 1990
Kansas University today received scholarship papers from Cortez Barnes, Wichita Heights’ 6-8 basketball forward, who on Tuesday signed a letter of intent with the Jayhawks. “We’re extremely happy about Cortez Barnes’ decision,” KU coach Roy Williams said in a statement today. “We feel he is a young man with outstanding potential and we all look forward to working with him in the Kansas basketball program.
TASK FORCE SETS INITIAL MEETING
May 4, 1990
The first meeting of the Indian Nation at Risk task force, which was appointed by U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos, will be May 14-17 in Washington, D.C., a member said Thursday. Bob Martin, president of Haskell Indian Junior College, said the 15-member committee would establish its goals and work plan during its first meeting.
TRIPLEX ISSUE NOW UP TO ZONING BOARD
May 4, 1990
Attorneys’ arguments are completed and all of the exhibits are in; now it’s up to the Lawrence Board of Zoning Appeals to decide whether to allow an East Lawrence triplex to continue existing as a legal, non-conforming use. The board, at its Thursday meeting, received findings of fact and heard closing arguments from attorneys representing the principals in the case, East Lawrence resident Richard Kershenbaum and triplex owner Paul Horvath.
LHS SENIOR, NOT BUSH, TO SPEAK AT GRADUATION
May 4, 1990
President Bush won’t be speaking at Lawrence High School’s graduation ceremonies this year. Nor will U.S. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, R-Kan., even though school representatives managed to travel to Washington, D.C., to ask that she do so.
NEXT MEETING SCHEDULED ON AIRPORT MASTER PLAN
May 4, 1990
The second of several public access meetings for current and future needs of the Lawrence Municipal Airport will be 7 p.m. May 29 in the city commission room at city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts. Bob Newton, chairman of the city’s Aviation Advisory Board, said he expected the consulting firm of Muller, Sirhall and Associates Inc. to make a few recommendations on future airport needs.
TAMARA C. BAKER
May 4, 1990
Memorial services for Tamara Camilla Baker, 25, will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday at Rumsey Funeral Home in Lawrence. Private inurnment will be in Oak Hill Cemetery. She was cremated. Miss Baker was last seen alive Oct. 31. Her body was found in a wooded area in east Lawrence last week. Authorities say she was murdered and are investigating her death.
SENATE OKS SPENDING CUTS
May 4, 1990
The Senate passed a plan today that would cut state spending by about $43 million and raise revenues by another $24 million. The Senate passed two companion bills, one that would cut state spending by 1 percent across the board. It also would make selective cuts in about 15 state agencies.
THELMA M. DALQUEST
May 4, 1990
Services for Thelma M. Dalquest, 77, Topeka, will be 10 a.m. Saturday at Klasse Chapel at First United Methodist Church, Topeka. Graveside services will follow at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Highland Cemetery, Junction City. Mrs. Dalquest died Wednesday at her home.
ETHICS, CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS AMONG AGENDA ITEMS
May 4, 1990
An agenda filled with a variety of topics, ranging from capital improvements to ethics to Community Development Block Grants, awaits the Lawrence City Commission Tuesday. The commission meets at 6:35 p.m. Tuesday in the first-floor meeting room at city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts.
AT WATKINS
May 4, 1990
With strings attached to some local history, a marionette exhibit will open this weekend at the Elizabeth M. Watkins Community Museum, 11th and Massachusetts. The exhibit, “Pulling Strings: The Bushong Marionettes,” opens Saturday and looks back at the work of three sisters who made marionettes and staged shows with their hand-operated creations in Lawrence more than 50 years ago.
MARIJUANA MERITS?
May 4, 1990
Lawrence had the dubious honor this week of being host to a stop on something called “Hemp Tour ‘90.” You won’t find it on any chamber of commerce brochure. The group came to Lawrence to promote the legalization of marijuana, a move speakers claimed would help solve many American problems from the deficit to the environment. The only problem with their rationale is that legalizing marijuana could only contribute to what many Americans see as the No. 1 problem in the nation the use and abuse of drugs.
THREE HASKELL STUDENTS COMPETE FOR HONOR OF REPRESENTING SCHOOL
May 4, 1990
The three contestants for Miss Haskell 1990 have been busy the past few weeks. They’ve been giving impromptu talks, performing traditional Native American songs and dances, filling out applications and preparing for final exams.
CORRECTION
May 4, 1990
Because of a photographer’s error, the owner of a pond at 10th Street and Monterey Way was incorrectly identified in Thursday’s Journal-World. The owner’s name is Carl Hird.
DESPERATE MEASURES
May 4, 1990
The thought of wounding or killing someone to protect property or a homestead is chilling and repulsive to most people. But put yourself in the shoes of someone who lives constantly under the threat of theft and bodily harm, and the perspective tends to change. Take a recent case in Denver. A man accused of setting a booby trap which killed a burglary suspect in a crime-plagued warehouse is getting substantial sympathy from a public fed up with crime. “I think we are getting demoralized here, and generally losing control of our community,” said T.J. Scranton, a one-time schoolteacher. “We’ve reached a place where the police can’t handle it.”
ATTENTION
May 4, 1990
Children, step right up to the big yellow bigtop where a world of artistic expression is at your fingertips. This isn’t a circus or a flea market. It’s Kaleidoscope a two-room tentlike structure that houses an arts program for children ages 6 through 12. Inside, they can color on textured tiles, play a steel drum or make yarn bracelets.
DOWNTOWN SURVEY SUPPORTS PLAZA LINK, PROPOSED TRAFFICWAYS
May 4, 1990
Downtown businesses support more long-term parking in the central business district, favor the construction of both an eastern and a southwest trafficway, and are opposed to increased penalties for repeat parking offenders in the downtown area, according to results of a survey. The survey, which was conducted by the Downtown Lawrence organization, was distributed in mid-March to 386 downtown business owners and managers.
HAMMER NAMED TO LHS GIRLS POST
May 4, 1990
Gary Hammer, a former Lawrence High basketball player, LHS junior varsity girls and sophomore boys basketball coach, today was named Lions’ head girls basketball coach. Hammer, 37, has directed the Lion girls JV to a 90-22 record the past seven years while also serving as varsity coach Larry Zientara’s main assistant in that span.
May 4, 1990
It’s hard to make room for Daddy in a trailer, especially when the Daddy is Edward O. Tarbox. Tarbox, a 1940s evangelical preacher, is fleeing Arkansas with his son, daughter and grand … well … child in “Tent Meeting,” the hilarious, sardonic play now showing at Kansas University’s Crafton-Preyer Theatre.
CITY OFFICIALS DEFEND NEW NOISE ORDINANCE
May 4, 1990
A recently enacted disturbing-the-peace ordinance may need some fine tuning but should be given a chance to work, city officials told a group of Kansas University student leaders. The ordinance was one of several topics discussed during a breakfast round table this morning attended by Lawrence city commissioners, City Manager Mike Wildgen, KU Student Senate representatives and KU administrators.
TAX RELIEF PLANS REMAIN IN LIMBO
May 4, 1990
The Kansas House rejected today yet another proposed classification amendment, sending a conference committee back to the bargaining table for perhaps one last effort later today to construct something that could gain two-thirds support. The Senate, meanwhile, continued debate this afternoon on a new property tax reduction plan. Its fate also was in considerable doubt.
HASKELL GRADUATES 140 STUDENTS
May 4, 1990
Haskell Indian Junior College’s first graduating class of the ‘90s became Haskell alumni this morning. During today’s graduation ceremonies, 140 students, wearing purple gowns and traditional Native American dress, received their degrees from Haskell.
T MIDAS, AFTER ALL
May 4, 1990
Because I was a young man at the time, I perceived Ewing Kauffman as an old man when he was awarded Kansas City’s American League expansion franchise back in 1968. Yet Kauffman was only 51.
KUMC NURSES VOTE FOR UNION
May 4, 1990
Despite intense opposition, Jane Starr’s one-year struggle to organize a union to represent 620 nurses at the Kansas University Medical Center is almost over. Starr, president of KU Nurses Assn., said nurses at the medical center Thursday voted 247-224 to designate the association as their official bargaining unit.
FRIENDS DESCRIBE LOCAL MURDER VICTIM
May 4, 1990
The last night her family saw her alive, a local murder victim left her home with three people who claimed they later dropped her off at a house in East Lawrence, according to two of the victim’s friends. The friends said Tamara C. Baker, 25, left her house about 9:30 p.m. Oct. 31 carrying her television set, which she told her ex-husband she planned to trade for food.
DESOTO SUPERINTENDENT TO LEAVE DISTRICT
May 4, 1990
DeSoto school Supt. Harold Vestal will announce his resignation to the DeSoto School Board at its next regular meeting Monday night. School board members are expected to approve Vestal’s resignation at the meeting.