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Archive for Sunday, June 10, 1990

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RANK AND ITS PRIVILEGES
June 10, 1990
It would seem that a growing number of Congressional lawmakers are taking note of public displeasure about their abuses of privilege for private gain, but the bad news is that too many of them still are not. The Dallas Morning News recently noted: “Apparently, the political liabilities connected with accepting speaking fees have become too great for 34 senators. A spot check by Congressional Quarterly magazine has found that the lawmakers are either declining all honorariums from outside groups or directing the money to charity. That number is 15 more than last year… . For many voters, the practice among lawmakers of accepting speaking fees from the same special interests that seek to influence them has become a striking symbol of what is wrong with Congress. Last year, House members, in exchange for a pay raise, voted to ban honorariums beginning in 1991. But the Senate refused to follow suit… . Instead, the senators adopted a wimpish plan to abolish speaking fees gradually, reducing the amount they can keep each year by the amount they receive in cost-of-living salary increases. Judging by the Congressional Quarterly survey, however, a fair number have taken it upon themselves to end the payoffs immediately.”
FOR THE RECORD
June 10, 1990
Law enforcement report Injury accidents
FESTIVAL GETS OFF TO A ROUSING START
June 10, 1990
George and Cindi Mills like crowd interaction. “We’ve found that if we can do stuff where the crowd can interact, you can get a much better show,” George says.
WOODLING COLUMN
June 10, 1990
Notes and quotes while wondering if Jim Valvano took a pay cut to sign that reported three-year, $900,000 contract with ABC-TV… Former Kansas football coach Mike Gottfried will be a member of ESPN’s college football broadcasting team this fall, barring any unexpected hitch in contract negotiations. “As far as I’m concerned it’s a done deal,” said Gottfried, now living in Mobile, Ala., since his firing at Pitt…
JUDGE BLASTS SENTENCING PLAN
June 10, 1990
A plan designed to standardize prison sentences statewide would have disastrous results if it went into effect, according to one Douglas County judge. But Kansas Sen. Wint Winter, R-Lawrence, agrees with the goals of the plan and said he believes it will deter would-be criminals.
JOHN COLYER SR.
June 10, 1990
Services for John Colyer Sr., 82, Lawrence, will be at 1:30 p.m. Monday at Rumsey Funeral Home with the Rev. David A. Aanonson officiating. Burial will be in Park Lawn Cemetery in Kansas City, Mo. Mr. Colyer died Friday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
LYLE D. TUBBS
June 10, 1990
Services for Lyle D. Tubbs, 55, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Tom Bassford officiating. Cremation is planned with inurnment to be held at a later date in Thailand. Mr. Tubbs died Friday at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in Topeka following a long illness.
LEGALIZING MARIJUANA
June 10, 1990
Editor, Journal-World: Sure, I got a chuckle when I first read about the Mark Creamer incident at the police station! But I don’t think it’s funny anymore. I feel compelled to express my opinion about this issue, if for no other reason than seeing an advocate of legalized hallucinogens receiving so much free publicity.
USED CLOTHING
June 10, 1990
Ardis Yarger is an experienced bargain hunter. She can find a good deal in antiques, and she can spot one in clothing as well. The Kansas University student shops used clothing stores fairly frequently and consigns clothing as well.
S RECYCLING EFFORTS TURN BOOK JACKETS INTO NEW FASHIONS
June 10, 1990
Suzanne Perry gets creative in her recycling efforts: turning discarded book jackets into fashion statements. “It’s kind of a simple craft,” Perry said.
BENEFITS OFFSET BURDENS OF DIVERSION AGREEMENTS
June 10, 1990
Diversion agreements are a hassle for almost everybody involved in the legal system. Defense attorneys say they have a tough job convincing prosecutors that their clients are worthy of a diversion. And once they do that, the attorneys say, they sometimes must harangue the defendant into completing the agreement’s terms.
LOCAL ARTS BOX OFFICE OPEN FOR CULTURAL EVENTS
June 10, 1990
The Murphy Hall box office on the Kansas University campus has reopened for the KU summer session and now is selling tickets for “The Robber Bridegroom,” a co-production of the University Theatre and Liberty Hall Players. The show runs July 5, 7 and 11-13. Tickets for the musical are also available at Liberty Hall, 642 Mass. The box office is also selling season tickets for the university’s Concert, New Directions and Chamber Music series and its 1990-91 theater season. It is open from noon until 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday until July 27. Individual tickets for events will not be available until the box office reopens for the fall semester on Aug. 20. Community theater announces season
EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN IS TOPIC OF KU SYMPOSIUM
June 10, 1990
Although social workers cannot empower others, they can identify empowering resources for their clients, a group of scholars said Saturday. At a two-day symposium on “Building on Women’s Strength’s: A Social Work Agenda for the 21st Century,” eight experts on social work addressed a complexity of concerns about women.
CLARINDA CLIPS TRAVELLERS
June 10, 1990
The Maupintour Travellers agreed to play a courtesy game with the Clarinda, Iowa, A’s Saturday night at Hoglund-Maupin Stadium. The visitors, however, were rather discourteous, pounding out 12 hits and taking advantage of five Travellers’ errors en route to a 7-5 semi-pro baseball victory.
INCOMING FRESHMEN, PARENTS GET THEIR FIRST TASTE OF KU LIFE
June 10, 1990
About 650 parents and students got their first taste of life at Kansas University Saturday when they attended the first 1990 orientation session for incoming freshmen. It was a full day that included remarks from Chancellor Gene Budig, class enrollment sessions and tours of the campus.
SENIOR LIVING TAB
June 10, 1990
Douglas County Senior Services figures it helps 425 people a day. Many of its programs are offered at the Lawrence Senior Center, but the agency is working to make service to local senior citizens a community matter, involving other local agencies and professionals.
LOCAL CHURCH GROUP HITS THE ROAD TO HELP KEEP AREA HIGHWAYS TIDY
June 10, 1990
Within the first 200 feet or so of their trek down the side of Kansas Highway 10 from the east city limits of Lawrence, each of the volunteer’s blue trash bags was nearly full and they were ready for a new container. Ten members of the First United Methodist Church’s handbell choir took to the highway Saturday morning, doing their part to clean up Kansas.
CHALLENGES FORMCENSORS
June 10, 1990
Artists who dare draw, paint or photograph the human body face a contemporary quandary. On the one hand, the advent of modern art allows the artists all kinds of license with interpreting the human form: nude, clothed or abstract.
LOCAL TEMPORARY SERVICES TAKE ROOT
June 10, 1990
The temporary service industry once a novelty in Lawrence is apparently here to stay. Five years ago, Manpower Temporary Services was the only agency offering temporary services in town, supplying clients with about 4,000 hours of temporary help a week.
HOSPITAL REPORT
June 10, 1990
ADMISSIONS Heather Watgen, Lawrence.
BOARD TO VOTE ON PORTABLE CLASSROOM
June 10, 1990
The Lawrence school board will hold its next regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Lawrence High School library. During the meeting, the board is scheduled to: Vote on the purchase of a double portable classroom building to handle anticipated enrollment increases at South Junior High School. Administrators are recommending that the portable building be purchased from Kan-Build of Osage City for $33,750.
HERMANN HANGS ON, WINS TITLE
June 10, 1990
Jared Hermann has proven one should never, ever give up in a tennis match. “I was amazed I won it,” said the Lawrence South Junior High ninth grader, who, on Saturday morning, defeated Baldwin High senior Billy Taylor 3-6, 7-6 (14-12), 4-0 (ret.), in the finals of the Lawrence Closed Junior Tennis Tournament at the Tennis Center.
PURDY ACQUAINTING HIMSELF WITH LHS
June 10, 1990
Dick Purdy is putting some heavy-duty mileage on his car this summer. “Right now, I’m driving up every day. We have voluntary weight training from 7 to 9 in the morning and 5 to 7 at night,” said Purdy, the former Lee’s Summit, Mo., High football coach, who, on April 18, was named Bill Freeman’s successor at Lawrence High.
S LIFE INTERESTING
June 10, 1990
Working with students was a big perk of Clark Coan’s job at Kansas University. It kept him on the Hill for 33 years. Coan retired June 1 as director of foreign student services and associate dean of student life.
VOLUME OF CALLS EXCEEDS PREDICTIONS
June 10, 1990
Until last month, speech- and hearing-impaired residents of Kansas couldn’t order carry-out Chinese food for dinner, call theaters for weekend movie schedules or contact a relative in the case of an early morning emergency. Until the Lawrence-based Kansas Relay Center opened, private relay services that translated messages between speech- and hearing-impaired persons and those who could hear and speak were available only from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.