Archive for Saturday, December 8, 1990

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KU STUDENTS BRIGHTEN HOLIDAYS FOR ELDERLY
December 8, 1990
Kansas University students involved in the Rock Chalk Revue benefit variety show are ready to spread the holiday spirit. For the first time, Rock Chalk participants will work together this year on a half-dozen community service projects.
QUILTS ADD FESTIVE LOOK TO MUSEUM
December 8, 1990
The holidays have a quilted look at the Elizabeth M. Watkins Community Museum, 1047 Mass., with a 35-quilt exhibit of the works of Kansas quilter Helen Ericson. With the Christmas shopping season in full swing and the museum decorated for the holidays, museum director Steve Jansen said the exhibit has been drawing downtown shoppers as well as local and out-of-town quilting enthusiasts. The quilts will be on display through Dec. 21.
OFFICIALS
December 8, 1990
The deputy director of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation says critics have knocked the bureau’s new $2 million fingerprint computer because only 17 suspects have been identified by the system since it went on line in September. But the deputy director, Steven Starr, and a local detective who has used the system say they’re impressed with the computer’s performance so far and think it will be a boon to law enforcement in the future.
PAUL G. LIMBERG
December 8, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Paul G. Limberg, 32, McLouth, will be said at 1 p.m. Monday at Mount Olivet Chapel in St. Joseph, Mo. Burial will be in Mount Olivet Cemetery. Mr. Limberg died Thursday in a one-vehicle accident north of Midland.
HENRY J. SALER
December 8, 1990
Services for Henry J. Saler, 65, Eudora, will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Family of Faith Church in Eudora. Burial will be in Shawnee Mission Memory Gardens Cemetery. Mr. Saler died Friday at Humana Medical Center in Overland Park.
MASON HAPPY HERE, HE SAYS
December 8, 1990
Kansas football coach Glen Mason wants to set the record straight. “I’m very happy here,” Mason stressed on Friday. “I’m very optimistic and enthusiastic about next season. I think we’ve made great strides. And I’m very happy working for Bob Frederick and Gene Budig.”
FIRE CAPTAIN GETS PROMOTION TO MAJOR
December 8, 1990
Lawrence Fire Chief Jim McSwain Friday promoted a 41-year-old captain to the rank of major, the second-highest rank in the department. Capt. Jerry Karr was chosen from a field of six captains to fill the position held by Maj. Paul Findley, who is retiring Wednesday after 30 years with the fire department.
S HIGH COURT DISMISSES LAWSUIT ON VEHICLE TAXES
December 8, 1990
Saying the proper forum is at the district court level, the state Supreme Court dismissed on Friday a lawsuit brought by a Johnson County couple seeking to force refunds on 1990 motor vehicle taxes paid in 77 Kansas counties, including Douglas County. The suit can be refiled in district court in any one of those counties, but Friday’s action means the Supreme Court will not hear the case directly.
PROGRAM SEES RISE IN REQUESTS FOR AID
December 8, 1990
The number of applications for Holiday Bureau aid continues to outpace the number received by the same time last year, the program’s coordinator said. As of Friday, 817 applications had been received since organizers began accepting requests Nov. 1.
AREA WOMAN ELECTED TO AGRICULTURE BOARD
December 8, 1990
Area farmers have elected Norma Babbitt of Overbrook to the Douglas County Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation Service committee. Ballots from the election were counted this week, Brian Morray, ASCS director, said.
WOMAN HOSPITALIZED AFTER BEING HIT BY CAR
December 8, 1990
An elderly rural Lawrence woman who was struck by a car Friday night in northern Lawrence was listed in serious condition today at the intensive care unit at Kansas University Medical Center. Marjorie Broat, 79, Rt. 1, suffered head injuries in the accident, which occurred at about 4 p.m. Friday about one-tenth of a mile east of North Iowa Street on River Ridge Road, Lawrence police said today.
SATURDAY COLUMN
December 8, 1990
Various individuals have tried to predict what the decade of the 1990s will be remembered for and what some of the major “causes” or concerns are likely to be during the next 10 years. Those associated closely and emotionally with a particular cause or effort naturally hope their specific project will capture the public’s attention and support. Currently, one of the major concerns and efforts by many focuses on the environment. This is a worldwide concern, not limited to one particular country. “Environment” covers an extremely broad spectrum and can touch just about any human activity. Many have tried to group these various and diverse efforts under the label of the “greens,” perhaps starting with a group of ecologists and environmentalists in West Germany who formed a political party and elected members to the West German parliament. The German “Greens” suffered major setbacks in their country’s just-completed elections with news reports telling about the “far leftist” Greens, “Europe’s most established ecology movement,” losing most of their seats in the German parliament.
SOLDIER CHARGED IN SHOOTING THAT INJURED FOOTBALL PLAYER
December 8, 1990
A 24-year-old Fort Riley soldier was formally charged with a felony count of aggravated battery after he allegedly shot a Kansas University football player early Friday morning outside a Lawrence nightclub. The soldier, Johnny White, made a first appearance in Douglas County District Court at 4 p.m. Friday.
KANSAS, WICHITA STATE REACH FINAL
December 8, 1990
Wichita State’s women’s basketball team planned to show up this afternoon in Allen Fieldhouse, maybe even deliver a victory against Kansas in the Dial Classic championship game, said second-year Shocker coach Linda Hargrove. But she didn’t figure it would be easy.
NOT A PRETTY PICTURE
December 8, 1990
The controversial and questionable prediction of a Dec. 2 or 3 earthquake along the New Madrid Fault from Arkansas through Missouri to Illinois provided us with another classic example of the modern trend toward pack journalism for events of dubious distinction. While a good many of the media outlets in our general region took the entire matter with a badly needed grain of salt, so-called reporters and photographers from numerous sources poured in and turned what should be a serious matter into a circus. Some of the pictures and interviews on television, for example, were just about as silly as they could be. Granted, certain communities may have benefitted from the dollars such interest put into their cash drawers, but the scene was nothing about which people concerned over public perception of “the media” should be proud.
OFFICIALS SAY FIRE STARTED BY CIGARETTE
December 8, 1990
A fire started by a discarded cigarette caused about $25,000 in damage to a mobile home Friday night in south Lawrence, Lawrence firefighters said today. There were no injuries reported in the fire, which began at about 7:30 p.m. Friday at 1900 W. 31st, S-16.
T-BIRDS SLIP BY LIONS, 78-76
December 8, 1990
Maurice Trotter is listed as 6-foot-2 in the game program. He played like 7-foot-2 Friday night. But Trotter’s 32-point, 13-rebound performance wasn’t quite enough to lift LHS in its 78-76 home-opening loss to Shawnee Heights.
HOSPITAL REPORT
December 8, 1990
DISMISSALS Arlene Bolinger, Oskaloosa; Velma Ballard, Lawrence.
FOR THE RECORD
December 8, 1990
Law enforcement report Police reports
CULTURAL IDENTITIES TO REMAIN FOR EC COUNTRIES, CONSUL SAYS
December 8, 1990
The concept of a single-market economy in the European Community will bring many changes to its participating nations, a British diplomat said Friday, but it will not rob countries of their cultural identities. Ray Mingay, British consul general stationed in Chicago, told a small audience in the Kansas Union that one does not have to look past Great Britain, Ireland, Scotland and Wales the four countries that constitute the United Kingdom to see that national culture can withstand a common leadership.
IS THE FEE FAIR?
December 8, 1990
Many Kansas University students are opposing a special fee proposed to help the engineering school keep up with equipment costs. The fee would put a surcharge, of sorts, on all engineering classes, charging students in those classes an extra $15 for each credit hour. Engineering school officials say the revenue from the fee is needed to keep equipment up to acceptable levels. Opponents of the fee say it sets a dangerous precedent for “differential tuition.” The costs of an education for all KU students, they say, should be shared by all the students. If a fee is necessary, it should be added to the general tuition of KU students.