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Archive for Thursday, August 30, 1990

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FOR INSPIRATION
August 30, 1990
Tinsely Wert’s ceramic sculptures look like toy people trapped forever in states of anxiety or elation. Two girls cry beside a twisted red wheelbarrow. A woman holds up a crustacean, as if to celebrate its capture. A person dressed in a black restraining jacket sits, twisted and trapped, on a large, black chair.
NEW $1 MILLION COMPUTER PUTS KU RESEARCH ON FAST FORWARD
August 30, 1990
It’s not every day that a Kansas University department gets to purchase a $1 million piece of equipment. But KU’s Academic Computing Services recently acquired a Vax 9000 computer, which lists for $1.549 million. The outdated Vax 8650 was traded to Digital Equipment Corporation, bringing the price down to $1 million.
DORIS M. TRUE
August 30, 1990
Services for Doris Mae True, 53, Lawrence, will be 1:30 p.m. Friday at Lamb-Roberts Funeral Home in Ottawa, with the Revs. James Logan and Bill Brewer officiating. Burial will follow in Highland Cemetery, Ottawa. Mrs. True died Tuesday of natural causes at Olathe Medical Center in Olathe.
EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTION CAUSES SMOKE
August 30, 1990
A large column of black smoke spiraling into the air north of Lawrence on Wednesday afternoon was the result a equipment malfunction at the KPL Gas Service Lawrence Energy Center. David Spacek, operations superintendent at the energy center, said today that a coal pulverizer on one of the energy-producing units northwest of Lawrence overloaded, allowing an improper combination of coal and air into the pulverizer.
GEORGE B. SEYMOUR
August 30, 1990
Funeral services for George B. Seymour, 66, Tonganoxie, will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Quisenberry Chapel here with the Rev. David Petersen officiating. Burial will be in Mount Muncie Cemetery, Leavenworth. Mr. Seymour died Wednesday at Providence-St. Margaret Health Center, Kansas City.
CONTRIBUTIONS
August 30, 1990
Some school superintendents are effective administrators and others are remembered for the fact they got along so harmoniously with teachers, principals and others in their educational system. Few, however, are able to blend the two talents as effectively and productively as did Carl Knox in his 22 years as superintendent for the Lawrence school district. Knox died Tuesday at a Kansas City hospital after a heart attack the previous weekend. He was 73. He had been felled by a stroke earlier but had made excellent progress since then and even had been able to play some golf of late on a limited basis. He had retired in 1984 at the age of 67 and after years of the constant, around-the-clock demands posed by people in the field of education, he had been thoroughly enjoying having time with wife Dorothy and his daughters and their families to do all the things he had been forced to put on hold. He took particular delight from his golfing activities and friends, and was excited when he was able to “get back out a bit” following rehabilitation from his stroke.
WELCOME EFFORT
August 30, 1990
Among the latest efforts to spruce up the downtown area is a recent facelift by Reuter Organ Co. Reuter, one of the city’s long-time employers, has recently painted and repaired its building just south of the new Riverfront Plaza and done some window replacement.
JUDGE SAYS AREA FORTUNATE TO GET ADDITIONAL YOUTH HOME
August 30, 1990
Douglas County Dist. Judge Jean Shepherd said the addition of a third house for an area youth facility will help ease the large number of children in the court system needing special care but who currently have no place to go. “From a community perspective and from a placement perspective, I think we are fortunate to have this expansion,” she said.
JOHN C. CARROLL
August 30, 1990
Services for John C. Carroll, 86, Wichita, were Monday at Lakeview Funeral Home chapel in Wichita. Burial was in Lakeview Memorial Gardens. Mr. Carroll died Friday at his home.
EMILY P. TURNEY
August 30, 1990
Memorial services for Emily P. Turney, 87, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. next Thursday at Trinity Episcopal Church. Cremation is planned. Rumsey Funeral Home is handling the arrangements. Mrs. Turney died Aug. 1 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
NOISE ORDINANCE TRIAL POSTPONED
August 30, 1990
The trial of a Kansas University student charged with violating Lawrence’s noise ordinance was continued today as attorneys prepared for a legal battle on the constitutionality of the city law. The trial of the student, Derek Bridges, was postponed indefinitely in Lawrence Municipal Court, where he and his attorney are fighting the ordinance on grounds that it is too vague and may violate his First Amendment rights of free speech.
COMPANY WANTS TO SELL THEATER
August 30, 1990
A downtown Lawrence movie theater that has been closed for nine months is up for sale and won’t be reopened by the chain that owns it. The Granada Theatre, 1020 Mass., “will not reopen as a United Artists theater,” Blake Fisher, UA’s regional operations manager in Denver, said today.
WARSHAWSKI FILM
August 30, 1990
“Warshawski,” a film based on the works of Kansas native Sara Paretsky, is scheduled to begin shooting this fall at Walt Disney Studios. Kathleen Turner is scheduled to play the Chicago detective who’s the central character of six Paretsky novels. Paretsky is the daughter of Mary and David Paretsky of Eudora. David Paretsky recently retired from the faculty at Kansas University. Mary Paretsky is the children’s librarian at the Lawrence Public Library.
HOSPITAL REPORT
August 30, 1990
ADMISSIONS Lawrence Stellwagen, Silver Lake.
GERMAN MEDICAL STUDENT TURNS VACATION INTO ON-THE-JOB TRAINING
August 30, 1990
Midway through her two-month stay at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Inken Scheewe is finding her summer vacation an educational one. Scheewe, a 26-year-old medical student from Eutin, Germany, has spent about a month working with several local radiologists and is now beginning a four-week stint observing internal medicine specialists. She said she considers her stay here a good opportunity to see first-hand how American physicians work.
ART AUCTION TO BE PART OF WELLSVILLE FESTIVITIES
August 30, 1990
Among the many attractions and events planned for the Wellsville Days celebration Sept. 15-16, festival-goers will have a chance to own a piece of Heartland art. A 22-inch by 30-inch drawing, “Warm Autumn Colors,” by Elizabeth “Grandma” Layton will be auctioned off at noon on Sept. 15. The proceeds earned at the auction will benefit the Wellsville Library. The festival lineup for Sept. 15, a Saturday, will feature a breakfast of biscuits and gravy at Mason’s Hall, a one-mile fun run, 5-kilometer run, main parade and children’s parade. Almost 100 craft and food booths are expected to exhibit and sell their wares throughout the day.
CAMPUS CRIME RISES THIS YEAR
August 30, 1990
The number of crimes reported on the Kansas University campus rose sharply during the first seven months of 1990, according to figures released by KU’s police department. From January to July 1990 of this year, 836 crimes were reported, compared with 636 crimes during the first seven months of 1988 and 680 during the same period in 1989.
WOMAN FOUND GUILTY IN CAR-TRAIN FATALITY
August 30, 1990
A 24-year-old Tulsa, Okla., woman Wednesday pleaded no contest and was found guilty of amended misdemeanor charges stemming from a 1989 accident that killed a Haskell Indian Junior College student. The woman, Edwina Rae Sandoval, originally was charged with two felony counts of aggravated vehicular homicide but pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor count of vehicular homicide.
KU PROFESSORS DISCUSS ISSUES BEHIND GULF CRISIS
August 30, 1990
Floyd Preston, professor of chemical and petroleum engineering at Kansas University, points to a saying written on the blackboard in his Learned Hall office as he makes a point about the current crisis in the Middle East. “Oil is wealth, wealth is power, power is politics, oil is politics,” the words on the blackboard say.
KNOX SERVICES
August 30, 1990
Memorial services for Carl S. Knox, 73, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Virgil Brady officiating. Private burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mr. Knox, former superintendent of Lawrence public schools, died Wednesday at St. Luke’s Hospital, Kansas City, Mo.
FOR THE RECORD
August 30, 1990
Law enforcement report Police reports
FUTURE
August 30, 1990
The city of Lawrence is joining Allen Realty Inc. in appealing a court decision involving demolition of a 120-year-old Lawrence church building. The city filed a notice of appeal late Wednesday in Douglas County District Court over a decision in a lawsuit pitting the Kansas State Historical Society and the Lawrence Preservation Alliance against Allen Realty and the city.
MARY LOU HAY
August 30, 1990
Graveside services for Mary Lou Hay, 75, Asheville, N.C., will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Walnut Creek Cemetery south of Wellsville, with the Rev. Ron Goodman officiating. Services also will include military honors by the Louis Hanson Post No. 194 of the American Legion, Wellsville. Mrs. Hay died Wednesday at an Asheville hospital.
LOCAL LIBRARY ADDS VIDEOS ON KANSAS
August 30, 1990
Lawrence Public Library patrons now have 13 new opportunities to learn more about the state of Kansas. The library recently added 13 videocassettes from KTWU’s Sunflower Journey series. All deal with various aspects of the Kansas and have been seen during the past year on Topeka’s Channel 11 television station.
SCULPTURE TO BE SET NEAR INTERSECTION
August 30, 1990
Workers are preparing for installation of a sculpture in a pocket park at the intersection of 23rd and Massachusetts. The piece, “Improvisation,” by Lawrence artist Jon Havener, will be installed during the coming week and will be unveiled during dedication ceremonies planned for 5:30 p.m. Sept. 7.
HAPPY HOSTS
August 30, 1990
Dear Editor: The August temperatures were no match for the warmth of feelings generated between the delegation of Japanese teen-agers and our host families during their recent sister city visit. Many people in Lawrence were involved in one way or another, and all deserve a big thanks.
COUNTY DEBATES 2 INSURANCE PLANS
August 30, 1990
The Douglas County Commission Wednesday night heard two different proposals for insuring the county. At issue is whether the county will stay with its present insurance company or join a group of Kansas counties in a new program, the Kansas County Association Multi-Line Pool. The pool is intended to offer counties broader coverage with no deductibles in some areas.
IS KANSAS SLOGAN
August 30, 1990
There’s nothing outlandish about Kansas University’s football slogan this year. “The thing we tried to do is stay away from any promises and predictions. We didn’t pick a saying like `We’ve Turned the Corner’ or `This Is The Year,”’ says Kip Helt, KU’s director of marketing. “We’re guaranteeing hard work. We guarantee our team will not be outhustled. That’s `Hawks At Work.”’
FRANK CORDIER
August 30, 1990
Services for Frank Cordier, 86, Lawrence, are pending at Rumsey Funeral Home. He died today at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
TWO MOORES TOO MANY FOR MOST
August 30, 1990
One Moore is a handful. Two Moores is a load. Virginia opponents sure wish they’d seen less of the Moores last season, but they’ll be seeing plenty more of the Moores this fall. Senior quarterback Shawn Moore is a legitimate Heisman Trophy candidate.
PARTNERSHIP TO OPEN DOORS AT BAKER
August 30, 1990
A new nursing education partnership with Stormont-Vail Regional Medical Center in Topeka opens degree doors for Baker University, according to a university official. Keith Keeling, provost and dean at Baker, said the program affiliation with the hospital, which is expected to be in place by fall 1991, will mean two degree programs in nursing as well as another degree option.
COMPANY PLANS PLANT IN DESOTO
August 30, 1990
A Canadian company that manufactures commercial air-conditioning and heating units plans to build a factory in northeast DeSoto that ultimately will employ 250 people. The firm, Airtex Inc., is based in Calgary, Alberta, and plans to begin construction on the plant after an environmental study of the proposed building site is completed. Plans call for the study to be completed in about two weeks and for the plant to open in early 1991.
HILLEARY CONFIDENT ENTERING SEASON OPENER, FIRST START
August 30, 1990
Chip Hilleary isn’t losing any sleep over Saturday’s home and season football opener against Virginia. “I’m real excited. I feel confident with our offense, our whole scheme for Virginia,” says KU’s sophomore quarterback.
S FIGHT AGAINST RACISM
August 30, 1990
Kansas University’s effort to foster cultural and ethnic diversity on campus may create a backlash of discriminatory behavior, the university ombudsman said. Robert Shelton, the ombudsman, said Wednesday at a University Forum that it’s possible KU students angered by attention given to minorities will react in protest.
CITY NOW OFFERS TIRE DISPOSAL SERVICE
August 30, 1990
A new service unveiled by the city will help Lawrence residents and businesses who are trying to get rid of old tires now that the local landfill won’t take them. Patricia Marvin, city recycling coordinator, said that the Lawrence Sanitation Department will collect old tires and haul them to a Leavenworth tire recycling center.
PEACE GROUP PROGRESSING FINANCIALLY
August 30, 1990
Organizers of the Meeting For Peace say they have raised more than $130,000 of the event’s $400,000 budget. “We wanted to make sure we had some of the foundation stones in place, and I think it’s going pretty good,” said Karon Brashares, executive director of the Meeting For Peace a weeklong Soviet-American conference that will be held Oct. 12-18 in Lawrence and other Kansas cities.
POPULARITY NOT A PERK OF PARKING PATROL JOB
August 30, 1990
Who do Kansas University students love to hate? Student parking ticket writers, of course. “I’ve never had any physical threats,” said Coby Craghead, a Wichita senior in his third semester on the job.
POLICY
August 30, 1990
Black students at Kansas University burned copies of the University Daily Kansan Wednesday afternoon after being told that the newspaper would not capitalize “black” when referring to students of African-American descent. Derek Schmidt, fall Kansan editor, recently reversed the newspaper’s policy of using a capital “B” when referring to black students. In the first issue of the paper, Aug. 22, Schmidt said he had decided that the Kansan would lowercase “black” during the fall semester.