Advertisement

Archive for Sunday, August 5, 1990

All stories

HIGH SCHOOL ADVICE
August 5, 1990
Editor, Journal-World: I don’t understand why this school board has decided to go directly against what their appointed task force reported to them. The Secondary Schools Facilities Task Force recommended in its report to the Lawrence Public Schools Board of Education, dated May 9, 1988, “that a new school building be constructed on another site to accommodate eleventh and twelfth grade students and that the present Lawrence High School building at 19th and Louisiana provide for students in grades nine and ten.”
LOCAL ARTS
August 5, 1990
Art show poster goes on sale The 1990 Lawrence Indian Arts Show poster is now available for sale at the Kansas University Museum of Anthropology Gift Shop. “Three Winnebagos and One Sioux,” a gouache painting by Winnebago artist Laurie Houseman-Whitehawk, is featured on the poster. The painting depicts three Winnebago women in traditional regalia at a powwow. A fourth woman is dressed in traditional Rosebud Lakota Sioux regalia. The poster advertizes the Indian Arts Show, which will open in September.
August 5, 1990
President Mikhail Gorbachev is urging Western companies to do business with the Soviet Union, and a number of Americans have been particularly eager for us to “help the Russians help themselves.” But before there is any headlong rush in that direction, it is worth considering points such as these.
WALTER MYERS REPUBLICANS 45TH DISTRICT
August 5, 1990
Baldwin Age: 58 Occupation: Farming and business Q. Do you favor placing restrictions on abortions in Kansas? Why or why not?
MARK R. CREAMER DEMOCRATS FOR CONGRESS
August 5, 1990
312 Indiana Age: 43 Occupation: Sculptor, house husband, former plumbing contractor Q. What steps do you favor to reduce the federal deficit? Be specific about any spendning cuts you advocate.
ELLIS R. HAYDEN COUNTY COMMISSION
August 5, 1990
3812 Stetson Dr. Age: 66 Occupation: Businessman Q. If voters reject the $4 million bond issue for the southwest Lawrence trafficway during the general election, should the county proceed with plans for the road? Why or Why not?
MIKE HAYDEN REPUBLICANS FOR GOVERNOR
August 5, 1990
Atwood Age: 46 Occupation: Incumbent governor Q. Do you favor placing restrictions on abortions in Kansas? Why or why not?
JOHN CARLIN DEMOCRATS FOR GOVERNOR
August 5, 1990
Topeka Age: 50 Occupation: President, Economic Development Associates Inc. Q. Do you favor placing restrictions on abortions in Kansas? Why or why not.
MALLEY GOP 46TH DISTRICT
August 5, 1990
127 Pinecone Dr. Age: 29 Occupation: Law student Q: Do you favor placing restrictions on abortion in Kansas?
BARBARA BALLARD 44TH DISTRICT
August 5, 1990
Q. Do you favor placing restrictions on abortions in Kansas? Why or why not? A. I could not place restrictions on legal and safe abortions for women in Kansas. One of the things we, as Americans, hold most sacred is the right of our freedom of choice. Laws will prevent neither pregnancies nor abortions. Instead, appropriate education of the responsibilities of sexuality, child birth, and parenting should be stressed.
RICHARD RODEWALD 43RD DISTRICT REPUBLICAN
August 5, 1990
Q. Do you support funding the third year of the Margin of Excellence program for state universities? Why or why not? A. The Margin of Excellence program is a comparison of the six Kansas colleges and universities with comparable schools in other states on faculty and staff salaries and operating expenses. The goal is 100 percent on faculty and 95 percent on staff salaries.
TRAVS TIP LIONS, 9-3
August 5, 1990
Maupintour’s Travellers simply own the Stan Musial Kaw Valley League. Lawrence’s semi-pro baseball squad, which has won the league crown the past three years, took a one-game lead in the standings with four games to go by slapping Louisburg, 9-3, on Saturday night at Hoglund-Maupin Stadium.
HOSPITAL REPORT
August 5, 1990
DISMISSALS Sheryl Lynn Simmons and baby boy, 2814 Maine Ct.; Madalyn Collins, Baldwin; Patricia Anderson Meier and baby boy, Ottawa; Debra Lee Wensel, Tonganoxie; Deborah Eileen Ellwood and baby girl, Lawrence.
S FOUNDER PLEASED WITH ITS START
August 5, 1990
Jacob Gordon sifts through the mound of messages on his desk at the Center for Black Leadership Development and Research and makes a mental note to get an administrative assistant. Gordon, who’s been at Kansas University for more than 20 years, has been extremely busy the past few months.
ELIZABETH M. BURGOYNE
August 5, 1990
Funeral services for Elizabeth Marie Burgoyne, 95, Lecompton, will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Rumsey Funeral Home in Lawrence. Burial will be in Maple Grove Cemetery, Lecompton. Mrs. Burgoyne died Friday at Heritage Manor Nursing Home in Lawrence.
AIR COMMAND BAND HEADS TO LAWRENCE
August 5, 1990
For Lawrence residents who want to plan their Labor Day weekend in advance, tickets to a Strategic Air Command Band concert Sept. 2 will be available starting at noon Tuesday at the Journal-World offices, 609 N.H. The band’s visit to Lawrence is sponsored jointly by the Kansas University Department of Bands and the Journal-World.
KU FOOTBALL NOTES
August 5, 1990
KU’s freshmen will practice Monday through Wednesday, with varsity players checking in Thursday. First full-squad practice will be Saturday. Two-a-days begin Tuesday, Aug. 14, with the season opener against Virginia set for Sept. 1. Kickoff is 1 p.m. at Memorial Stadium… Coach Glen Mason is ready to go. “We’re very anxious to get the season underway,” said the third-year KU coach. “We ended the 1989 season on a positive note (win over Missouri) and that carried over into winter conditioning and spring drills.
BEDORE NOTES AND QUOTES
August 5, 1990
Wichita State senior forward Aaron Davis has been forced to give up basketball because of a heart condition. Davis, a starter who averaged 10.4 points and 4.7 rebounds while starting 19 games his junior year, has a “dysfunctional heart muscle” according to WSU officials.
CANDIDATE NO-SHOWS MARK SENATE RACE
August 5, 1990
In the Republican U.S. Senate primary in Kansas, the word “race” doesn’t apply. The incumbent, Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, has opposition but her challenger, R. Gregory Walstrom, Lawrence, has done nothing publicly to make voters aware of his positions on issues.
TEACHERS ADD AGRICULTURE TO LESSON PLANS
August 5, 1990
Gone is the era when most local children had to finish farm chores before going to school each morning. Subsequently, fewer children today realize where the food on the dinner table originates, or that much of it comes from Kansas. To help students better understand food production and to learn how to incorporate agriculture in the classroom, three local elementary teachers took a course from Kansas State University last month.
OFFICIALS DOUBT TURNOUT WILL DETERMINE OUTCOME
August 5, 1990
City officials say they hope Tuesday’s election will draw a large number of voters to the polls, but they say that the size of the turnout isn’t likely to affect the outcome of balloting for the proposed city sales tax increase. Lawrence voters will be asked Tuesday to approve a -cent increase in the city sales tax. Money from the increased tax has been earmarked for hiring and equipping 27 additional police officers and nine firefighters. Whatever money is raised in excess of the funds going for police and fire needs has been pledged to reducing the mill levy for Lawrence property owners.
PENSIONS A SORE SPOT IN INSURANCE RACE
August 5, 1990
Back in Lawrence for a brief respite from campaigning, Ron Todd, assistant state insurance commissioner, said he has been sticking to the same theme in all his campaign stops that his actual experience in the insurance commission’s office makes him the best man for the department’s top job. But Todd, a Lawrence Republican, said he is a little miffed that one of his two opponents in the GOP primary, House Speaker Jim Braden, R-Clay Center, has been raising an issue about the state pension that Todd is drawing.
WEST ROMPS IN SHRINE BOWL, 32-0
August 5, 1990
The West had never won so big in a Kansas Shrine Bowl game. Harold Harris had never lost so big in Haskell Stadium. Scoring steadily with a perfectly balanced offense, the West routed the East, 32-0, Saturday night in the Shrine game at Haskell, breaking the margin-of-victory record set last year when it won, 31-0.
SHRINE BOWL STATS
August 5, 1990
West FJ East
GOOD REPRESENTATIVES
August 5, 1990
Dear Editor: Kansas was well represented at the Junior Legion World Series in Minnesota this weekend. We could not hand-pick a better group of teen-agers to represent us than the Lawrence Class A Legion team and their manager, Lynn Harrod.
ROBERT O. WATCHOUS 43RD DISTRICT
August 5, 1990
DeSoto Age: 59 Occupation: Lawyer Q. Do you favor placing restrictions on abortions in Kansas? Why or why not?
POLL
August 5, 1990
Lawrence voters strongly support a half-cent increase in the city sales tax, according to results of a Journal-World poll. The poll of registered voters, conducted this past week, shows that nearly 62 percent of respondents said they would vote in favor of raising the city sales tax. A total of 22.5 percent indicated they would vote against the sales tax, and almost 16 percent said they were undecided.
S RESEARCHS FAMILY TREE
August 5, 1990
Marilyn Elaine Patrice White of Los Angeles found her family in a drawer people on paper, long since gone from this world. Undaunted, she followed their paper trail back to Lawrence, where it turned into a blizzard and led her to a host of real live cousins and double cousins she never even knew existed. Ms. White is a bi-lingual specialist for Los Angeles County schools and a family historian who last week wrapped up a month-long visit here.
STEAM ENGINES BRING BLAST FROM THE PAST
August 5, 1990
Herb Edmonds says the annual McLouth Steam Engine Show and Threshing Bee is more than a bunch of venders, antique tractors and motors. “Once you get involved in it, it’s a perpetual consideration,” Edmonds said.
FRESHMAN GRIDDERS REPORT TODAY
August 5, 1990
Today’s the day Kansas University’s 23 freshmen football signees report for duty. “They check in, eat a meal and kind of get settled,” said Lynn Bott, KU’s director of sports medicine and head athletic trainer. “There’s time to take a breather before everything begins.”
ACCORDION CONFERENCE TO PUT THE SQUEEZE ON KC
August 5, 1990
To some people, a four-day accordion convention would seem like a weekend tour of purgatory. For example, in a “Far Side” cartoon, we see one group of people riding an up escalator, while another rides a down escalator. An angel greets those going up, saying “Welcome to Heaven. Here’s your harp.” A devil greets those going down, saying “Welcome to Hell. Here’s your accordion.”
LOCAL ECONOMY WINS IN RECENT SPORTING EVENTS
August 5, 1990
In the last two weeks, Lawrence has hosted a major golf tournament and the state’s first Sunflower Games competition. And this weekend, the city became the fez capital of Kansas, with about 10,000 visitors expected for the annual Shrine Bowl high school football game.
CALLER I.D. SERVICE IS STILL YEARS AWAY
August 5, 1990
With supporters and challengers speaking out on controversial new telephone technology that would allow customers to know the telephone number of the person calling them, it will be a few years before the technology is available to Kansas customers, a Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. official said. Debbie Vignatelli, regional community relations manager for Southwestern Bell in Salina, said “Caller I.D.” technology would not be available to customers until sometime after 1992.
ABOUT THE PRIMARY
August 5, 1990
The Lawrence Journal-World recently posed questions to 20 federal, state and county candidates seeking their party’s nomination for offices in contested primary elections. Their answers and photographs, listed by office and in alphabetical order, follow. Complete slates in all races are included here, except for the Republican gubernatorial primary. Three candidates who filed to seek the party’s nomination for governor did not return the Journal-World’s questionnaires and a fourth, Louis Klemp of Leavenworth, withdrew from the race Thursday.
LIFE IN A SCIENCE-FICTIONAL UNIVERSE
August 5, 1990
“Deathgift” opens on a vast, empty plain inhabited by the typical characters of a fantasy novel: an orphan with exceptional powers, a strange society of outlaws skilled in combat and priests and bards wielding mystical powers. But the author of “Deathgift,” Ann Tonsor Zeddies, has more tricks up her sleeve than swords and horses. Thanks to an amazing stunt by Singer, Zeddies’ musically inclined, telepathic warrior-hero, the novel shifts midway into a terrifying, violent science fiction saga.