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Archive for Sunday, April 1, 1990

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April 1, 1990

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High-spirited spectators crowded the sidelines at Kansas University's Memorial Stadium Saturday afternoon, shouting and cheering for their favorite teams.

No, the Jayhawk football team wasn't making an off-season appearance. This crowd was rooting for men and women scrambling around after a giant ball in the crab soccer event of the Greek Olympics.

All of KU's 38 fraternities and sororities participated in the Olympics, which marked the end of Greek Week activities, explained Liz O'Leary, Greek Week chairman and member of Kappa Alpha Theta.

Parents of the Olympians comprised some of the rowdy crowd.

"A lot of houses are having mom's weekend or dad's weekend," O'Leary said. "We encouraged everyone to bring their parents. It's fun for them to see us goofing around."

IN ALL, ABOUT 500 braved the chilly weather to watch or join in the six events.

Each house paid a $100 entry fee to cover equipment rental and use of the stadium, but the event was not a fund-raiser, O'Leary said.

"We wanted to do more of a fun Greek Week. We wanted to be able to get everyone involved. We wanted to get really good communication going between houses," she said.

The egg joust event was a big attraction. It involved a man with a woman sitting on his shoulders and an egg on top of his head, secured with a piece of pantyhose. Four such teams struggled through each round with the women attempting to smash the eggs on the male opponents' heads.

KYLE MEAD, a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, was one athlete who found himself with egg on his face, or rather, in his hair when his team was eliminated in the semi-final round.

Other events in the Greek Olympics were Twister, water balloon volleyball, pie-eating, and a bed race around the stadium's track.

The Olympians will be honored at Greek Recognition Night in Hoch Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. tonight. The ceremony will thank fraternity and sorority members for their participation in Greek Week, as well as for scholarship and community efforts, O'Leary said.

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