Archive for Saturday, October 21, 1989

REGENTS REJECT SALINA PROPOSAL

October 21, 1989

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HAYS (AP) Kansas College of Technology should remain at its current site and try to develop the campus for growth, the Kansas Board of Regents ruled Friday.

The board rejected a proposal from the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce to help finance a proposed new engineering technology school on the closed campus of Marymount College.

The regents' primary objection to the plan was a condition that the state contribute $7.5 million to match $7.5 million from the city.

The plan, offered by chamber President Gary Rumsey, would raise $7.5 million with a mill levy increase to buy and renovate the Marymount campus that closed in June and use it for the program. Rumsey said a similar amount in matching funds would be needed to convert the campus into a Kansas State University branch.

``We just don't have enough money, even with the fine offer from the good people of Salina, to go ahead with that particular proposal which would compete with our other campus needs in the system,'' said Norman Jeter of Hays, regents chairman.

However, the regents agreed to have a task force study ways to improve the Kansas School of Technology at the old Schilling Air Force Base in Salina and convert it into a Salina campus of engineering technology administered by Kansas State.

Under that plan, most of the older buildings would be razed, excess land would be sold and a new main entrance to the campus would be created.

No time frame was given for the regents' study committee, but the regents said the issue should be given some priority.

In other action Friday, the board:

Authorized issuance of $1.3 million in revenue bonds to renovate the Memorial Union Building at Emporia State.

Approved a motion changing the name of the Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University to the Docking Institute of Public Affairs. The change honors a family long associated with Kansas government former governors George Docking and Robert Docking and former Lt. Gov. Tom Docking.

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