Archive for Tuesday, November 7, 1989

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November 7, 1989
Members of Lawrence High School’s Students Against Driving Drunk chapter were to meet with the Kansas attorney general this afternoon to present him with a “chain of life.” The “chain of life,” explained Preston Caprez, the state SADD coordinator, is a paper chain that students from Kansas SADD chapters made at a conference in early October.
MACSOURCE OPENS DOORS THIS WEEK
November 7, 1989
MacSource, a new business specializing in the sale and service of Apple Macintosh computer equipment, will open its doors by the end of this week, said Jeff Sigler, who co-owns the business with Brent Flanders. The business will be located at 1420-B Kasold Drive, in the Orchards Corners Shopping Center, 15th and Kasold.
FOR THE RECORD
November 7, 1989
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
N.H. STOP SIGNS NOT SUPPORTED
November 7, 1989
Motorists using New Hampshire Street between 19th and 23rd streets won’t be seeing any additional stop signs, if the Lawrence City Commission follows the recommendation of the Traffic Safety Commission. The TSC, at its meeting Monday, followed a staff recommendation and refused a request to place stop signs on New Hampshire at the intersections of 20th, 21st or 22nd streets.
KU GAME NOTES . . .
November 7, 1989
KU coach Roy Williams said it was possible the Jayhawks could have some signees on Wednesday, first day of the early signing period. “I don’t know if I expect any, but I’m hopeful. It’s an uneasy kind of hopeful,” Williams said, not naming any names. “It’s always uneasy during recruiting time.” …
$2 MILLION RAISED FOR LIED CENTER
November 7, 1989
A local fund drive has netted more than $2 million for Kansas University’s Ernst F. Lied Center. Don Johnston, corporate general manager of Maupintour Inc. of Lawrence and chairman of the Lawrence Campaign, said the local fund-raising effort has garnered $2 million to $2.2 million for the planned performing arts center.
PROFESSOR
November 7, 1989
Kansas University anthropology professor Dorothy Willner says an effort to dismiss her from the university is an attack on her rights as a scholar and a citizen. But Allan Hanson, professor of anthropology, disputed that claim Monday during testimony before the KU Faculty Senate Committee on Tenure and Related Problems.
J.O. THORNE
November 7, 1989
Services for J.O. Thorne, 76, Salome, Ariz., will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Quisenberry Chapel in Tonganoxie with the Rev. Ben Saathoff officiating. Burial will be in Maple Grove Cemetery, Tonganoxie. Mr. Thorne died Sunday at his home. He was born Feb. 11, 1913, in Ocrachie, Okla.
RAY OROKE, CORNHUSKER PAR EXCELLANCE
November 7, 1989
Ray Oroke, 68, the competitive cornhusker featured in Monday’s Journal-World profile, husked his first field of corn at age 16 about the time Lawrence played host to the national cornhusking competition. Called the “Farmer’s World Series,” the 16th annual national event occurred in early November 1939 north of Lawrence, just about where Grant School is today. The late Emil Heck was general chairman.
LOCAL MAN CONTINUES HUNGER STRIKE
November 7, 1989
For six days, a local man who is on a hunger strike has consumed nothing but fruit juice, coffee and water. Fred Markham, who has cerebral palsy, has been on a hunger strike, directed at the Kansas Civil Rights Commission, since 6 p.m. Wednesday. He wants to file a complaint with the KCRC that states Independence Inc., an organization that assists local disabled people, stopped running his column in its newsletter in retaliation for an employment discrimination complaint he had filed.
WATER LINE REPLACEMENT TO BEGIN IN LECOMPTON
November 7, 1989
Work on a $450,000 water line project is tentatively scheduled to begin Nov. 30, the Lecompton City Council learned Monday night. Councilman Carl Bahnmaier said a representative from Miles Excavation of Basehor, the company hired to perform the job, told the council last night that the project would begin late this month, weather permitting.
NEW SISTER CITY
November 7, 1989
Dear Editor: On behalf of the Sister Cities Advisory Board to the city commission, I want to thank all the Lawrence people who kindly greeted our recent visitors from Eutin, West Germany. The delegation met a great many friendly Lawrencians through a variety of meetings, workshops and social and cultural events intended to introduce them to our city and give citizens here an opportunity to meet Eutiners. We felt this was a very satisfying opening to our official sister city relationship.
THANKS TO FIREFIGHTERS
November 7, 1989
Dear Editor: At 4 p.m. on Oct. 19, an electrical fire broke out in the kitchen ceiling of a house I rented, and the fire was put out before I got home at 4:45. I removed a few things, left the house and returned the next afternoon to find out that the fire had reignited and was extinguished again early Friday morning. Due to the industriousness of the Lawrence Fire Department, my losses were minimal. My cleaning bills will be a lot higher this month, but I am very lucky to even have anything to clean at all. The firemen covered my furniture and belongings with tarps resulting in little fire and water damage.
FEARS
November 7, 1989
Graveside services for Georgia Irene “Tye” Fears, 77, Lawrence, will be at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at Oak Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Fears died Monday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. She was born Feb. 20, 1912, at Altus, Ark. She lived in Lawrence since the early 1960s.
PLASTICS COMPANY LISTS PAY RATES
November 7, 1989
Penn Plastic Inc., a Pennsylvania-based company interested in locating in Lawrence’s East Hills Business Park, would have an initial annual payroll of about $764,000, a Lawrence Chamber of Commerce official said today. Bill Martin, director of economic development for the chamber, based the figure on the average of wage scales for 50 workers, which the company says it will employ at the plant in its first year of operation in Lawrence.
CLAYTON M. QUERREY
November 7, 1989
Graveside services for Clayton M. Querrey, 71, Tampa, Fla., will be at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Ellsworth Cemetery. Mr. Querrey died Sunday at his home. He was born Feb. 28, 1918, in Ellsworth.
POND DRAINED TO PREPARE RURAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENT
November 7, 1989
A pond just east of the southeast corner of Wakarusa Drive and Clinton Parkway was drained over the weekend to prepare the property for development, according to a representative of the owner. The pond, just west of Raintree Montessori School, was drained as the first step in what probably will be a two-year process of developing the property, said Jim Clark, whose mother-in-law, Dorothy Booth, owns the property.
MANNING RECEIVES OK TO PRACTICE
November 7, 1989
Los Angeles Clippers forward Danny Manning, who has been working out on his own to rehabilitate his left knee, has been cleared to practice with the team beginning Nov. 15, General Manager Elgin Baylor said. Manning tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee last Jan. 4 and underwent reconstructive surgery Jan. 15.
HOSPITAL REPORT
November 7, 1989
ADMISSIONS Noland Louk, 1119 W. 22nd St.
THREE-POINTERS PROPEL KU, 98-53
November 7, 1989
Like good motorists, Kansas’ basketball players are waiting patiently for the green light. “Coach Williams hasn’t decided yet,” said senior guard Jeff Gueldner, awaiting rulings on which Jayhawks will be allowed to proceed with three-point shooting this season.
CORRECTION
November 7, 1989
Because of a reporter’s error, a story in Saturday’s Journal-World contained incorrect information about how long the Lawrence Police Department training academy will run. The academy will be held for about four months.
IMPLEMENT DEALERS SEE IMPROVING SALES
November 7, 1989
Lawrence’s three farm implement dealers all say the past year has been a good year for business. Although some farmers in the area were hit by the drought, an improved economic climate brought out more equipment buyers this year, they said.
S AGRICULTURE THE STAR OF THE SHOW
November 7, 1989
It’s a night when farm and city get together to put Douglas County agriculture in the spotlight. Wednesday is the night of the Farm-City Mixer, an annual event put on by the Agriculture Committee of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce.
80S
November 7, 1989
How much does an acre of farmland cost these days in Douglas County? There’s no simple answer to that question, according to lenders and real estate agents who deal with farm property.
SALARY
November 7, 1989
Douglas County Dist. Atty. Jim Flory just needs the approval of the Lawrence City Commission before he has an assistant who can devote his time entirely to drug-related prosecutions in 1990. The commission will be asked for $10,000 to match a similar outlay from the Douglas County Commission. The funding would allow Flory to hire an entry-level prosecutor. Such a move would allow Rick Trapp, an assistant to Flory, to devote his duties on a full-time basis to providing legal advice and assistance to the Lawrence-Douglas County Drug Unit.
CORRECTION
November 7, 1989
A caption on page 1A of Thursday’s Journal-World gave the incorrect last name for a woman who was taking a picture of a family near Potter Lake. Her name is Kathi Armstrong.
SHOPPING CENTER PLAN TAKES SHAPE
November 7, 1989
Work may begin as early as next month on an office building being planned as part of a larger neighborhood shopping center development on the city’s western edge, a local real estate agent said. The shopping center project, which tentatively will be called Alvamar Shops, is being developed by Landon Associates. It would sit in a triangular configuration on the southeast corner of West 15th Street and Wakarusa Drive, said Doug Brown, a commercial leasing agent for McGrew Real Estate.
SPTS VOLLEYBALL
November 7, 1989
High School ALL-KAW VALLEY LEAGUE
BACKERS OF NEW DESOTO SCHOOLS REGROUP FOR NEXT BOND ELECTION
November 7, 1989
The DeSoto School Board on Monday night scheduled a public meeting for 2 p.m. Sunday in the high school auditorium to create an advisory committee to help guide the board into its next bond issue election. District patrons two weeks ago decisively defeated a $12.39 million bond issue election that would have financed a new high school and elementary school in Shawnee. District officials insist that the bond issue election, in which 65 percent of the vote went against the proposal, was not a vote against new schools per se.
S BECOMING FACTOR
November 7, 1989
Derrick Thomas entered the NFL with a reputation as a fierce pass rusher. The former Alabama standout hasn’t disappointed after nine games of his rookie season.
CAREERS IN AGRICULTURE
November 7, 1989
Careers in agriculture are anything but limited, according to Jack Lindquist, agricultural extension agent for Douglas County. “It goes far beyond farming,” Lindquist said.
DOUGLAS COUNTY FARM FACTS
November 7, 1989
EDWARD S. AVISON
November 7, 1989
Memorial services for Edward S. Avison, 84, will be at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Gambrill Gardens, Ellisville, Mo., with the Revs. John Ward and Ivan Lee officiating. Burial arrangements are pending at Mount Hope Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.. Mr. Avison died Sunday at St. John’s Mercy Medical Center, Creve Coeur, Mo.
INDIAN CORN PUTS ASPARAGUS FARMERS INTO BLUE CHIPS
November 7, 1989
Karen Pendleton’s eyes are the color of corn chips. So is her car and the cloudless sky above the family’s farm. Mrs. Pendleton and her husband, John Pendleton, grow blue Indian corn, which they make into chips and distribute to local stores. The chips range in color from a pale bluish-gray to a purplish-black.
TESTS SHOW VICTIM WAS INTOXICATED
November 7, 1989
A 21-year-old Lawrence man whose body was found Oct. 24 floating in the Kansas River was intoxicated at the time of his death, Douglas County Coroner Carol Moddrell reported today. Moddrell said laboratory tests showed that Cecil Dawes Jr. had a blood-alcohol content of about .18 when he drowned in the river. Under Kansas law, a person is considered to be under the influence of alcohol if his or her blood-alcohol level is .10 or above.
DOWNTOWN
November 7, 1989
One of the many sculptures that adds visual spice to the downtown area apparently was knocked over Monday night. The fish-shaped sculpture was toppled from its base at the northeast corner of Eighth and Massachusetts.
LIONS PICK GOOD TIME FOR BEST GAME OF YEAR
November 7, 1989
No telling what second-ranked Lawrence High absolutely had to do to make this week’s Class 6A state football semifinals. What the Lions DID was play their best game of the season, routing No. 3-ranked Olathe South, 28-0.
TRIAL
November 7, 1989
Jury selection in the trial of a man charged with killing a Lawrence boy in July 1988 started today, more than 15 months after he was arrested in connection with the murder. Attorneys began questioning prospective jurors at 10 a.m. today, starting what promises to be a lengthy selection process. Under a motion granted Monday by Douglas County District Judge James Paddock, attorneys will question every candidate for the jury about publicity the case has received and the issue of using insanity as a defense.
3 AREA LEGISLATORS QUESTIONSPECIAL SESSION ON REAPPRAISAL
November 7, 1989
Three of Douglas County’s five legislators today said that although they don’t oppose a special legislative session on property reappraisal, they doubt it would get results. A growing number of legislators, led by state Rep. David Miller, R-Eudora, have called in the last week for convening a special session before Dec. 20, when property tax bills are due.
CROSS OF FIRE
November 7, 1989
The following editorial was written by Dolph Simons Sr., late chairman of the World Company, parent company of the Journal-World. It appeared in the Journal-World on Feb. 22, 1988. Simons recounted the Klan’s activities from first-hand experience. The editorial is reprinted for two purposes: to inform current local residents about the Klan and its operations and goals in Lawrence-Kansas University affairs, and to point out how “a pleasant, peaceful and prospering small city like Lawrence could so easily be engulfed by a secret organization based on hatred and threats of abuse.” It happened here
JOHNSTON LOVES TO COMPETE
November 7, 1989
David Johnston hadn’t owned his third state title long when he started talking about his fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh. “As far as athletics go, I don’t treat it as as big a deal as most people,” said Johnston, who added a Class 6A state cross country title to the 1600- and 3200-meter championships he won at May’s state track meet.