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Archive for Tuesday, December 5, 1989

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PROUD EAGLE
December 5, 1989
Editor, Journal-World: On opening weekend of hunting season a bald eagle was shot. This eagle, a rare and endangered species, journeyed from Alaska to skim the shimmering waters of our lakes and rivers in search of winter’s catch. This master hunter became the hunted. This symbol of independence and freedom became, in the flash of a single shot, dependent on and captive by the species that pulled the trigger and caused its crippling injury. The high-powered rifle broke this bald eagle’s “forearm.” The muscle was blown away. A U.S. Wildlife and Parks officer delivered this proud bird to wildcare volunteers at the Kansas University Amimal Care Unit.
DRUG CONCERN
December 5, 1989
It is good to learn Lawrence city commissioners are giving consideration to reactivating a citizens’ task force to evaluate local illegal drug use. It is apparent, however, that various commissioners have varying degrees of concern about the problem and the level of drug use in the Lawrence area. Several commissioners rationalized about local drug usage by saying the Lawrence situation is not as bad as it is in other major cities. It is hoped these commissioners are not operating under the illusion Lawrence does not have a serious drug problem. Secondly, if cities such as Lawrence can’t get a handle on the problem and make it known to the drug users and drug pushers that illegal drug use will not be tolerated, the city will have a growing drug problem.
PARKING PROBLEM
December 5, 1989
The new multi-level parking facility north of Allen Fieldhouse may be a handsome structure and provide badly needed additional parking spaces, but university or athletic department officials need to do a far better job of managing the facility. There was bound to be a “break-in” period for the multi-level garage, but this should have been done before the facility was put to actual use by those attending KU basketball games.
WARM HEARTS HAS SUCCESSFUL WEEK
December 5, 1989
In just the first week of collections, contributions to Warm Hearts of Douglas County have reached 20 percent of the fund drive’s goal. Warren Rhodes, treasurer of the eighth annual campaign to raise funds to help Douglas County’s needy pay their heating bills, said that as of Monday night, $14,660 has come in. Warm Hearts set a goal of raising $65,000 this year.
FOR THE RECORD
December 5, 1989
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
JOSEPHINE M. KUCKELMAN
December 5, 1989
Mass of Christian burial for Josephine M. Kuckelman, 87, Seneca, will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church, Seneca, with Abbot Ralph Koehler officiating. Burial will follow in Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Mrs. Kuckelman died Sunday at a Seneca nursing home where she had lived since January 1978.
ATTORNEY SEEKS NEW TRIAL IN MURDER OF LOCAL BOY
December 5, 1989
An attorney representing a 28-year-old transient convicted of killing a Lawrence boy in July 1988 has filed a motion for a new trial in the case. The attorney, Ed Collister Jr., lists six points in the motion stating that the trial of his client, John William, was not conducted properly.
LAWRENCE IN THE RUNNING FOR MORE FILM WORK
December 5, 1989
An exact date for showing Michael Landon’s made-for-television movie “Where Pigeons Go to Die,” which was filmed this fall in the area, has not been set, but a late January 1990 air-time is expected. Meanwhile, Kansas and Lawrence are in the running for the spring filming of a movie based on Robert Day’s book, “The Last Cattle Drive.” A production crew with the movie has been touring the state examining potential filming locations.
STUDENT INTERVENTION COMMITTEE FORMING
December 5, 1989
The DeSoto School Board on Monday approved the formation of a committee that will step in to assist students who are demonstrating problems in a wide range of areas. Asst. Supt. Glenn Coltharp said this morning that the committee will be based on a substance-abuse intervention concept, but will broaden that concept to cover a wider range of student problems.
BURNING RUBBER COVERS LINWOOD WITH SMOKE
December 5, 1989
An estimated 1,000 discarded tires, which ignited Monday about a mile south of Linwood, were still smoldering this morning as officials continued to investigate the cause of the fire. The fire produced large columns of thick, black smoke that reportedly could be seen from Kansas City, Kan., Lawrence and Topeka.
HIT-AND-RUN VICTIM WAS INTOXICATED
December 5, 1989
An elderly Horton man who died Sunday in a hit-and-run accident was intoxicated when the incident occurred, authorities reported today. Dr. Alan Sanders, deputy Douglas County coroner, announced that the blood-alcohol level of the man, Harry J. Oliver, was 0.18. Sanders said he determined the blood-alcohol level during an autopsy Sunday.
INQUEST
December 5, 1989
Douglas County Dist. Atty. Jim Flory said today that a coroner’s inquest into the Nov. 13 death of a 21-year-old Kansas University student has been scheduled for 9 a.m. Dec. 28. Flory announced Friday that an inquest would be held and said he would contact Dr. Carol Moddrell, Douglas County coroner, this week to schedule the date.
JOE FOLEY
December 5, 1989
Services for Joe Foley, 76, Lecompton, will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Rumsey Funeral Home. Burial will be in Hubbel Hill Cemetery in Tonganoxie. Mr. Foley died Monday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. He was a contractor with List and Clark Construction before he bought a farm in Douglas County and began soil and conservation work in 1940.
BUDIG OPTIMISTIC ABOUT KU FUNDING
December 5, 1989
Kansas University Chancellor Gene Budig is undaunted by predictions of gloom and doom for the Margin of Excellence program at state universities. “I continue to believe that there will be adequate resources for the continued advancement of higher education in Kansas,” said Budig, who spoke to Lawrence Rotary Club on Tuesday.
SET FOR FALL
December 5, 1989
Local voters won’t decide the fate of a $20 million to $25 million bond issue for a proposed second high school until late September, Lawrence school board members decided in a special meeting Monday. Also on Monday, the board ruled out the possibility of making the bond election Douglas County’s first ballot-by-mail election. Rather, the the bond issue will be decided in a traditional, ballot box election.
ARTS CENTER SEEKS TO DELAY EXPANSION VOTE
December 5, 1989
Lawrence Arts Center officials, mindful of burgeoning tax concerns for local property owners, is asking the Lawrence City Commission to postpone any action on a proposed $3.5 million expansion of the center. The commission is to receive at its meeting tonight a report from Acting City Manager Mike Wildgen listing options for a citywide referendum for financing the expansion. Following receipt of the report, commissioners were to discuss whether to schedule a public vote.
AP HONORS J-W PHOTOGRAPHER
December 5, 1989
Mike Yoder, chief photographer for the Lawrence Journal-World, has won two of the top three places in feature photography in the 1989 Missouri-Kansas Associated Press Newsphoto contest. The awards were presented Monday at the annual meeting of Missouri and Kansas AP newspaper members in Kansas City, Mo.
STATE RECEIVES 91 ROAD REQUESTS
December 5, 1989
The Department of Transportation said Monday that it has received 91 formal applications for funding for systems enhancement projects under the $2.8 billion highway improvement program passed by the 1989 Legislature. However, a spokesman said the department will not have a compilation of the applications or a total dollar amount for the 91 projects until next Monday.
HOSPITAL REPORT
December 5, 1989
ADMISSIONS Evelyn Saler, Eudora.
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN
December 5, 1989
Editor, Journal-World: In response to your editorial “Eagle adaptation,” I’m sorry, but you miss a very important point. The issue is not the adaptation of wildlife to the ways of humankind. The issue is developing a way of life for humans that is compatible with our local environment, one that does not destroy the habitat of bald eagles, frogs, milkweed, etc.
OFFICIAL SAYS LOCAL BUDGETS NOT PADDED
December 5, 1989
A state official’s claim that local governments throughout Kansas “padded” their budgets to skirt tax-lid provisions apparently doesn’t apply to Lawrence or Douglas County. “It’s pretty obvious to me they weren’t doing any padding, either the city of Lawrence or Douglas County,” said Dick Roller, supervisor for field services in the state’s Municipal Accounting Section.
KANSAS CLUBS UTM, 103-48
December 5, 1989
That quest to make the “flippin’ free throws” continues at Kansas. “I chewed their tails at halftime,” said coach Roy Williams. His Jayhawks hit just five of 16 free throws the first half 11 of 27 overall in KU’s 103-48 drubbing of NCAA Div.II Tennessee-Martin on Monday night at Allen Fieldhouse.
ARCHITECTS NAMED FOR LHS RENOVATIONS
December 5, 1989
In a 5-2 vote Monday, Lawrence school board members voted to hire Gould-Evans Architects to oversee a renovation project at Lawrence High School that would run concurrent to construction of a proposed second high school. Both projects hinge, however, on whether local voters pass a $20 million to $25 million school bond issue in late September.
GIFT OF LOVE
December 5, 1989
Dear Editor: The best gift you can give your children and others is the gift of love and social acceptance in school, the community, the church and the workplace. Teach your children not to tease children who are disabled mentally or physically or to call them names.
KU RESTS ITS CASE AGAINST PROF
December 5, 1989
Kansas University rested its case Monday in the first public tenure revocation hearing in school history, and a defense witness for Dorothy Willner said the professor hadn’t violated professional ethics in her research or teaching. Rose Marino, associate general counsel for KU, said she wouldn’t call more witnesses on behalf of the chancellor, who initiated the dismissal action, but her questioning of defense witness Nancy Sempolski was the most intense of the eight-week hearing.
HELEN L. CLARK
December 5, 1989
Services for Helen Lura Clark, 81, Eudora, will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at Stroup-Thompson Funeral Home in Winston, Mo. Burial will be in the Winston Cemetery. Mrs. Clark died Monday at the Eudora Nursing Center.
COUNTY TO DISCUSS HISTORIC BRIDGE
December 5, 1989
Douglas County commissioners are expected Wednesday to decide the fate of a 76-year-old bridge in the southwest part of the county, which has been nominated for the National Register of Historic Places. The stone-arch structure, known locally as the Chicken Creek bridge, was scheduled to be replaced last summer. However, county commissioners decided after a July public hearing to delay action until they gathered more information on alternatives to tearing down the bridge. At a meeting last month, commissioners looked at costs of various alternatives but delayed a decision on the bridge, saying they would wait to see what the Kansas State Historical Society does at its December meeting.
COUNTY SIRENS
December 5, 1989
No problems with Douglas County’s civil defense sirens were reported after a monthly system test was conducted Monday, a county official said. Paula Phillips, assistant coordinator of Douglas County emergency preparedness, said the 23 sirens in the county worked normally.
NIT REVENUE PLEASANT WINDFALL FOR JAYHAWKS
December 5, 1989
Kansas’ basketball victory over St. John’s in the NIT championship game did more than boost the Jayhawks’ morale. It should also bolster the KU athletic department’s sagging budget.
COUNTY ASSISTS IN KIDNAP SEARCH
December 5, 1989
Douglas County authorities today were helping the Topeka police department in its investigation of the kidnapping Monday of three Topeka residents. Sheriff’s officers, who were searching the Lecompton area today, confirmed that they were assisting in the investigation but declined further comment.
BOARD ERASES OPEN MEETINGS CHARGE
December 5, 1989
The Eudora School Board was found by the Kansas Attorney General’s office to have violated the state’s open meetings law recently, but the board has taken action to clear itself of the infraction. In a letter to a Eudora patron who lodged a complaint against the board, the attorney general’s office declared an executive session of the board to be illegal under the open meetings law.