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Artist Lecture: Gonkar Gyatso

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Event details

Born in Lhasa in 1961, Gyatso's artistic career charts the course of contemporary Tibetan history, documenting a creative engagement with what it means to be Tibetan in the 21st century. Currently based in London, he was the recipient of a Leverhulme fellowship in 2003 and became Artist in Residence at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford. His work has been internationally exhibited in galleries and museums in Europe and North America. Through his art, Gyatso charts the subtle shifts in identity and belonging caused by constant migration, exploring the hybrid fusion of cultures and tradition in contemporary global society. Tibetan artist Gonkar Gyatso will give a talk at the Spencer Museum of Art at 7 PM Thursday, August 28, tipping off three days of activities in the Lawrence and Kansas City area that will include visits to studios of local artists, talks with KU students and faculty, and a Saturday, August 30 lunchtime conversation at the Kansas City Art Institute's H & R Block Artspace. The events at the Spencer and the Artspace are free and open to the public."The recent Tibetan protests in Lhasa against Chinese occupation, and the related controversy around the Olympic torch relay worldwide prompted us to invite an artist who, through his exploration of Tibetan cultural identity, can provide fresh perspectives on the complex problems surrounding the rights of indigenous peoples in the contemporary world," says Kris Imants Ercums, SMA Curator of Asian Art.Following his Thursday talk at the Spencer, and Friday studio visits and other activities, Gyatso will join Ercums, and H& R Block Artspace Director Raechell Smith for T.N.T. (The Noon Thing), "A Conversation with Gonkar Gyatso," at 12 PM Saturday, August 30. The Artspace is located at 16 E. 43rd St. in mid-town Kansas City, one block east of Main Street (corner of 43rd and Walnut.) Free parking is available in the lot at the north side of the building.

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