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Ancient packrat nests crammed with clues about climate change

Packrats — pests or preservationists? That depends. Modern packrats have a reputation for ruining car engines and invading attics with nests they cram with debris. But Kansas University researchers have found nests of their ancient kin to be a powerful tool for studying climate change’s effect on plants. By Sara Shepherd

KU students working on a car to guard your health

Kansas University students are designing cars to monitor a driver's health or deliver a doctor's office to your home.By Elliot Hughes

Local beekeepers avoid widespread losses

Amid a nationwide conversation about the sudden disappearance of bees, only isolated incidents have occurred in Kansas. Though beekeepers near Lawrence and in most of the eastern part of the state are maintaining their colonies, entomologists and Chip Taylor, a professor of insect ecology at Kansas University, said Colony Collapse Disorder is something that may have widespread and lasting effects. Taylor said the environment is having a negative effect on all pollinators — a species that is, according to the USDA report, essential for one-third of all food and beverages made in the U.S. By Nikki Wentling

Students learn the ropes of summer research project

On her second attempt at tree climbing using the single-rope technique, Rebecca Tripp quickly ascended a 15-foot rope hanging from a branch of a pin oak on the Baker University campus. “ “You want a higher tree, don’t you?” said Dan House, a member of Tree Climbing Kansas City, who was instructing the first-time climber in the technique. Tripp nodded yes — and lowered herself into her wheelchair. She and seven other students from around the country were being introduced to tree climbing Thursday as part of a two-month summer research project. By Elvyn Jones

Lawrence school district's Science and Engineering Fair will showcase students' imaginations

The Lawrence school district's Science and Engineering Fair will take place this weekend at Southwest Middle School. More than 300 students will exhibit projects in life science, physical science and engineering. By Peter Hancock

KU microbiologist wins award known as precursor to Nobel Prize

Lutkenhaus and the other two scientists were honored for research that led to a greater understanding of bacteria cells.

Fewer butterflies this year at Monarch Watch’s tagging event

At the annual Monarch Watch tagging event Saturday morning, there was a lot of watching — but not so many monarchs.

Tonganoxie students make rare find of worms native to Asia

Some Tonganoxie inhabitants could be thousands of miles from home, according to researchers’ findings. Tonganoxie High School science teacher John Tollefson’s students in 2010 participated in Kansas State University’s Earthworms Across Kansas, a citizen science project for middle and high school students across the state.

Dinosaur hunter finds triceratops

A local dinosaur hunter just back from a fossil-finding trip to Montana will be working on a new triceratops fossil this winter, but it’s just the latest prize for Alan Detrich, who has collected many specimens over the years.

Destructive insect threatens Kansas ash trees

There’s a deadly bug on its way into northeast Kansas. And when — experts say it’s a matter of when, not if — it gets here, more than 10 percent of our trees could die.

Butterfly researchers set up shop in Lawrence

• History was made Wednesday in Lawrence, and it was all due to some winged visitors making their way through town. Princeton University professor and biologist Martin Wikelski is using radio transmitters to track the journeys of monarch butterflies in ...

Lawrence pay growth slows

In today's news: Wage, salary increase behind U.S., state averages in ’07; KU researcher detects missing link in spider evolution. In sports: Taylor named Big 12 Rookie of the Week

Scientists: Kan. faces dangers from rising CO2

Expect clouds with a bit of drizzle this morning. Temperatures will rise this afternoon as the sun comes out. Expect a high in the lower 50s. Temperatures will reach nearly 60 degrees on Thursday with winds from the southwest, but ...

A tour of the Natural History Museum's amphibian and reptile collection

Natural History Museum curator Rafe Brown talks about KU's amphibian and reptile collection. The collection is one of the biggest in the country.

Rafe Brown's most recent research trip to the Philippines

Rafe Brown, curator of herpetology at the Natural History Museum, discusses his most recent trip to the Philippines, where he collected about 400 amphibian and reptile specimens. He traveled there under a National Science Foundation grant to document as many species as possible of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, along with their parasites.

Ed Taylor's herpetology research while at Kansas University

Ed Taylor is known as the father of Philippine herpetology, which is the study of reptiles and amphibians. Taylor spent his whole teaching career at KU while not out in the field. He discovered many species, a few of which are still housed in the Natural History Museum.

Lawrence Teacher Headed to Galapagos

Southwest Junior High teacher Lisa Ball will spend two weeks in the Galapagos Islands as part of a Toyota International Teacher Program. She's part of a team of 24 teachers searching for environmental solutions.

Biosecurity Research Institute - keeping clean

It might be called the "Get Naked Room" but it's not nearly as much fun as it sounds. Just like surgeons, researchers at the K-State Biosecurity Research Institute have to follow a set of protocols before entering labs where they studied some of the most dangerous animal diseases in the world. Scott Rusk, director of BRI, explains the process that entails lots of showers and outfit changes.

Biosecurity Research Institute - training room

Not just anyone can enter the labs where vials of dangerous animal diseases are studied. Before researchers can do work on these highly secured areas, the must first go through training. BRI Director Scott Rusk talks about what they have to learn.

State Fossil One Step Closer to Reality

State Representative Tom Sloan (R), Lawrence, has announced plans to introduce legislation designating the Xiphactinusas the state fossil. Kansas fossil hunter Alan Detrich gave Sloan a petition with 3,000 names in support of the designation.

Hurricane in a box in Lawrence to stay

A chamber that can produce hurricane-like conditions has found a permanent home in Lawrence. The chamber can be used to test new building materials.

KU student awarded for work in green chemistry

A KU doctoral student earned a national award for his work in green chemistry. Madhav Ghanta, a 24-year-old student from India, was one of two people to win the award.

Stanford professor talks climate at KU

A Stanford professor and author spoke to students at Kansas University about the politics behind climate change Monday. Stephen Schneider believes science is a full contact sport.